Join Now | 
HomeAboutContact UsPrivacy & SecurityAdvertise
Soccer America DailySoccer World DailySpecial EditionAround The NetSoccer Business InsiderCollege Soccer ReporterYouth Soccer ReporterSoccer on TVSoccer America ClassifiedsGame Report
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalkSoccer America ConfidentialYouth Soccer InsiderWorld Cup Watch
RSS FeedsArchivesManage SubscriptionsSubscribe
Order Current IssueSubscribeManage My SubscriptionRenew My SubscriptionGift Subscription
My AccountJoin Now
Tournament CalendarCamps & AcademiesSoccer GlossaryClassifieds
4. ITALY SCANDAL: Indictments handed down
June 23rd, 2006 4:39PM



Waiting until after Italy clinched first place in Group E at the 2006 World Cup -- and until the close of the Milan stock market -- the Italian soccer federation (FIGC) prosecutors charged charged Juventus, AC Milan, Fiorentina and Lazio, as well as 26 individuals -- including officials of the clubs and the federation itself, eight referees and two linesmen -- in Italy's match-fixing scandal.
The FIGC indictments that came after the Azzurri beat the Czech Republic, 2-0, in Hamburg produced a combination that, as one television commentator put it, was "heaven in Germany and hell in Rome."
Two-time defending champion Juventus could face relegation to Italy's Serie C1 (third level) for its role in the scandal. Former Juventus general manager Luciano Moggi is accused of influencing refereeing appointments to benefit Juventus. On intercepted telephone conversations, Moggi is heard to be discussing with senior Italian soccer federation officials refereeing appointments for games in the 2004-05 season.
Also indicted were former Juventus CEO Antonio Giraudo and Milan's powerful vice president, Adriano Galliani, who also served as president of Italy's pro league. Galliani,  who quit as Italy's pro league president after the charges were announced yesterday, faces a single charge of violating fairness and probity,
Former FIGC president Franco Carraro was charged on suspicion of knowing about the manipulation of refereeing appointments but doing nothing to stop it.
The eight referees who were charged included Massimo de Santis, who was to work at the World Cup until his appointment was withdrawn after the scandal broke.
The verdicts will be delivered July 7-9 -- the latter being the day of the World Cup final. Prosecutors are also investigating charges that clubs and agents falsely accounted for transfers.

No comments yet.

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now



Recent Soccer America Daily
USA-Costa Rica: Klinsmann sends Johnson packing    
The biggest loss in the tenure of head coach Jurgen Klinsmann has not triggered any immediate ...
MLS Executive of the Year Manning joins TFC    
Bill Manning, the two-time Major League Soccer Executive of the Year, has been named president of ...
What They're Saying: Bill Manning    
"From an outsider's perspective -- and I remember telling this to the [MLSE] board -- for ...
Atlanta United joins Development Academy     
The youth program of Atlanta United, which begins MLS play in 2017, will join the U.S. ...
Video Pick: SKC's Nemeth scores twice in Euro qualifier    
After scoring MLS's Goal of The Week with a terrific solo strike against Portland, Sporting Kansas ...
U.S. Olympic hopefuls in must-win clash with Canada     
Having squandered a chance to clinch a berth at the 2016 Olympics when it fell, 2-0, ...
Crowd Count: Top 20 U.S. soccer crowds (2015)    
The crowd of 93,723 fans for the USA-Mexico game at the Rose Bowl was the largest ...
NASL: Minnesota joins Cosmos and Ottawa in playoffs    
Minnesota United FC clinched a playoff berth for the second straight year with a 2-1 win ...
TV Report: USA-Mexico averages 5.1 million on Univision    
The USA-Mexico match on Univision averaged 5.1 million viewers, the most on any network for a ...
What They're Saying: Jurgen Klinsmann    
"I had a very severe word with Fabian Johnson and I sent him home today. The ...
>> Soccer America Daily Archives