Join Now  | 
Home About Contact Us Privacy & Security Advertise
Soccer America Daily Soccer World Daily Special Edition Around The Net Soccer Business Insider College Soccer Reporter Youth Soccer Reporter Soccer on TV Soccer America Classifieds Game Report
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalk Soccer America Confidential Youth Soccer Insider World Cup Watch
RSS Feeds Archives Manage Subscriptions Subscribe
Order Current Issue Subscribe Manage My Subscription Renew My Subscription Gift Subscription
My Account Join Now
Tournament Calendar Camps & Academies Soccer Glossary Classifieds
Beware of Tournamentitis
by Sam Snow, January 3rd, 2008 5:30PM
Subscribe to Youth Soccer Insider

MOST READ
TAGS:  youth boys

MOST COMMENTED

By Sam Snow

Tournamentitis. True, it's not a real word, but it does convey the condition of too many tournaments on the American soccer scene. Indoor, outdoor, 3-a-side or 11v11 -- on almost every weekend of the year there are hundreds of tournaments of one type or another taking place across the land. They are for old and young and every level of play.

Tournaments started as a means to supply games for teams when there were far fewer teams than today. The distance between the teams often meant that the investment in time and money to get to another soccer club caused everyone to maximize the effort by playing lots of games.

These tournaments began in earnest in the 1970s. Clearly the number of soccer clubs has grown dramatically since then. The distance between teams has become closer simply because of the proliferation of teams in town after town.

Yes, geography still plays a major role in the way we manage soccer in the USA. The size of the country will not change and distance's impact on time and cost for travel will not change. What has changed and will continue to change is the distance between the home grounds of clubs.

In the 1980s, tournaments took on another focus. They became the main revenue stream for many clubs. Proceeds helped to build facilities, greased the wheels of local governments and business to support soccer by their financial impact on a community. The profits made even helped to create jobs within the clubs for administrators and coaches. Certainly many positive types of fallout from tournaments have aided in the growth of soccer in our nation.

Yet the dominant place of tournaments in youth soccer is a double-edged sword.

Often teams participate in tournaments for poor soccer reasons or no soccer reason at all. When a team plans to play in a tournament it must ask: who, where, when and why?

Teams should indeed play in tournaments to get exposed to a different style of play or a different level of competition.

With young teenage teams it can be part of learning how to play on the road. For older teams the chance at regional and national level competition can also provide for scouting opportunities by college and professional coaches.

In any case, the number of tournaments must be balanced with the rest of the team's schedule of training sessions and matches. There can be too much of a good thing.

The most talented players tend to play the most matches (100-plus) and are generally the least rested. By virtue of the number of matches played (and the minutes played therein) the most talented players tend to be under-trained (ideal 5:1 ratio; 10,000 hour rule - Istvan Balyi Ph.D., et al). Most of our elite players never learn how to train in a professional manner.

With so many tournament matches in two or three days, players go into survival mode and play in third gear. Seldom, except perhaps in the semifinal match, do they give 100 percent when on the field. This means our competitive players never learn how to play in a professional manner.

Mental and physical exhaustion leads to poor play, typified by kick-n-run soccer. These factors may also contribute to injuries as players who make late decisions get into tight situations and maybe bad tackles, unnecessary fouls, poor tactical positioning on the field and so forth.

To avoid the malady of tournamentitis a coach must carefully plan the season with a good balance of tournaments, league matches and training sessions.

In closing, here is the Position Statement from the 55 state association Technical Directors on the topic of tournament play:

"We believe that excessive play at competitive tournaments is detrimental to individual growth and development, and can serve to reduce long-term motivation.

"Do not multiple matches being played on one day and one weekend have a negative effect on the quality experience and development of the individual player? Further, far too many playing schedules include so many tournaments and matches that there is never an 'offseason.'

"We believe that players under the age of 12 should not play more than 100 minutes per day, and those players older than 13 should not play more than 120 minutes per day.

"We also recommend to tournament managers and schedulers:

* The players should be allowed ample rest between matches.

* That all tournament matches be of the same length and that no full-length match be introduced during playoff rounds.

* Kickoff times allow players a reasonable opportunity to prepare for competition. This encompasses rest and recovery, nutrition and adequate time to warm-up and stretch after traveling a long distance in addition to taking into consideration extreme environmental conditions.

(Sam Snow is US Youth Soccer's Director of Coaching Education. His most recent contributions to the Youth Soccer Insider was Reviving the Pickup Game.)



0 comments
  1. Brian Something
    commented on: January 7, 2008 at 9:50 a.m.
    Is there an irony that an add for a tournament ("4 game minimum") was embedded in this good article warning against too much tournament play?
  1. David Hardt
    commented on: January 8, 2008 at 9:06 a.m.
    It is about time this idea is considered. There is way too much play and not anywhere near enough training. I wonder why the US is behind in the world???

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now




AUTHORS

ARCHIVES
FOLLOW SOCCERAMERICA

Recent Youth Soccer Insider
Tab Ramos: 'The boys are starting to figure it out'    
"We know the important part of the tournament is how you end and not how you ...
USA already behind the eight-ball in U-20 World Cup qualifying    
The USA's quest to qualify for the 2017 U-20 World Cup is in danger just one ...
Tab Ramos on keeper Jonathan Klinsmann, captain Erik Palmer-Brown and the U-20 World Cup qualifying quest    
Tab Ramos, who played for the USA in the 1983 U-20 World Cup, now aims to ...
Girls DA Director Miriam Hickey: Federation is best suited to support clubs and coaches    
Miriam Hickey has been named Director of the U.S. Soccer Girls Development Academy, that which off ...
Anson Dorrance on Girls DA vs. ECNL -- and why the focus should be on the youngest ages    
We asked Anson Dorrance for his views on the strife between U.S. Soccer and the ECNL, ...
James Bunce: 'Players all develop at different times'    
When James Bunce headed Southampton FC's youth program, its ranks included Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, now an Arsenal ...
Meet Tab Ramos' 20 players for U-20 World Cup qualifying    
The USA's quest to qualify for a third straight U-20 World Cup begins Feb. 18 against ...
Ankle Sprain: When can I play again?     
There's never a good time to be injured. As we come up to the end of ...
Boys Development Academy adds 165 new teams    
The Boys U.S. Soccer Development Academy (DA) will enter the 2017-18 season with 17 new clubs ...
U-17 stars leave residency for MLS; Four newcomers head to Bradenton    
By the time Christian Pulisic played for the USA at the 2015 U-17 World Cup, he ...
>> Youth Soccer Insider Archives