Join Now  | 
Home About Contact Us Privacy & Security Advertise
Soccer America Daily Soccer World Daily Special Edition Around The Net Soccer Business Insider College Soccer Reporter Youth Soccer Reporter Soccer on TV Soccer America Classifieds Game Report
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalk Soccer America Confidential Youth Soccer Insider World Cup Watch
RSS Feeds Archives Manage Subscriptions Subscribe
Order Current Issue Subscribe Manage My Subscription Renew My Subscription Gift Subscription
My Account Join Now
Tournament Calendar Camps & Academies Soccer Glossary Classifieds
League should ponder 'reverse' format
by Ridge Mahoney, November 3rd, 2008 2PM
Subscribe to Soccer America Confidential

MOST READ

MOST COMMENTED

The best format for the MLS playoffs isn't yet feasible, simply because not every team has its own stadium, and to truly reward the best regular-season teams, the entire format would have to be reworked.

League officials claim the two-leg conference semifinals system is retained so each playoff team gets a home game: an admirable sentiment, but also misplaced, since, again, it would make more sense to reward the highest-finishing teams with home games, and let the others scrap it out on the road.

The downside of a one-game conference semifinal would be, of course, a higher-seeded team in a one-game playoff getting bumped off by a lower seed who packs it in and sneaks a win with a lucky goal or atrocious refereeing decision or on penalties. The higher seed should still be able to prevail, but we all know the contrarian nature of soccer can trip up even the best teams in these situations. I can't see the advantage of using a one-game format in the first round, unless somehow the highest seeds received byes.

If a lower seed has had to fight and scrap just to get into the playoffs, it can be sharper and hungrier than a team that clinched its spot with games to spare. Flawed though it may be, the two-game format can alleviate, somewhat, the effect on a team that clinched its playoff spot early, and thus finished out the season either playing less-intense games and/or with backups and reserves.

Coaches and players talk about the need to peak in time for the playoffs, but the MLS record books are full of higher-seeded teams that got thumped in the first round, even over two legs, or in a few cases, three (San Jose vs. Miami, 2001 playoffs, to cite one example). To counter this possibility, Crew head coach Sigi Schmid rested his Supporters' Shield regulars in the penultimate regular-season game, which Columbus lost to New York, 3-1, and rolled out the first team for the finale, a 1-0 victory that snuffed the hopes of D.C. United.

Even so, the Crew needed an incredible 92nd minute goal by Stephan Lenhart on Saturday to gain a 1-1 tie with a Kansas City team playing a man down following the ejection of Herculez Gomez in the 75th minute. Had the Columbus been in its own stadium for a one-game showdown, it would have played differently, but the cold logic is that any MLS team, regardless of its record, can beat any other on the day.

That's what parity is all about, so why should it change for the playoffs? Who's to say Kansas City wouldn't have been able to hold off the Crew and snatch a goal through Davy Arnaud or Claudio Lopez or even Jack Jewsbury, who did just that to upend defending champion San Jose in the 2004 playoffs?

Jewsbury scored that third goal in a 3-0 win at home, after San Jose had won the first leg, 2-0. Yet that playoff vividly demonstrated that a higher seed can overcome a two-goal deficit at home, difficult though it may be, and last weekend, only one higher seed playing on the road - Chivas USA - came out of the first leg trailing (1-0). The other three games ended tied.

Houston clinched the Western Conference title weeks ago yet came to New York relatively game-sharp, due to its Concacaf Champions' League duties. One can assume it would have blown away the Red Bulls at Robertson Stadium had they been playing a one-gamer, but funny things happen in soccer games.

The two-game conference semifinals give the league another valuable commodity: eight playoff games of heightened drama and intensity, with extensive media exposure and television coverage.

Using a one-game showdown to decide the conference champions and thus the MLS Cup participants is straight out of the NFL model, yet even the NFL "punishes" wild-card teams by prohibiting them from hosting a playoff game unless they face another wild-card team in the conference final. This can be adapted for MLS.

Ideally, what MLS would do is give four teams byes - either the top two in each conference or the conference winners plus the next two best teams - and match the other four teams in one-game, midweek showdowns: No. 8 plays at No. 5, and No. 7 plays at No. 6 on Wednesday and Thursday following the final weekend of regular-season play.

The two survivors would play at the third- and fourth-seeds the following weekend, again, one game, winner take all. Those higher seeds would only have one week to market and promote those games, true, but from a competitive standpoint, they would be playing teams coming off midweek games on just a few days' rest. That's the reward for finishing higher.

The two teams that come out of the week's activity would play the top two seeds in two-game semifinals, with the winners advancing to MLS Cup. The drawback for the higher seeds is they could be rusty after sitting out a week, but playing over two legs would offer them a chance to regroup should they struggle in the first game.

I hope the MLS Competition Committee can at least consider reversing its playoff format: i.e., using one-game playoffs -- with the higher seed hosting -- in the first round, and spreading the conference championships over two legs. Not every playoff team would be "guaranteed' a home game, but so what? The first-round winners would indeed play at home in the second round.

Ever hear of "win and you're in?"



0 comments
  1. Dave Carney
    commented on: November 3, 2008 at 2:33 p.m.
    They should scrap the playoff all together. There should be a league champion from league play and a league cup champion from a concurrently played tournament over the course of the season. The playoffs are lame. Just because it works for other American sports doesn't mean MLS has to have playoffs too.
  1. David Sirias
    commented on: November 3, 2008 at 4:15 p.m.
    MLS is not ready for single table no playoff champion. For now playoffs are a necessary evil in the evolution of MLS. That being said the author's playoff idea is the best conceived that I've encountered. My only additional suggestion is that the No. 1 be rewarded by never having to travel.
  1. Frank Cebul
    commented on: November 3, 2008 at 11:54 p.m.
    In America, do as the Americans do. MLS needs to have a playoff champion to satisfy a deep American need for an unambiguous king-of-the-mountain. I agree with much of Ridge's train of thought, but I disagree with two-game semi-finals. Any argument for 2 legs in the semi's would also apply to the finals, but no one in their right mind would recommend a 2 legged final. So I say let the conference championships be single games hosted by the teams with the better season records. If the MLS wants an additional game for more exposure, there can be a 3rd place game, much like the Olympics, between the losers of the conference championship games. Sure, boring bunker style soccer may win an occasional game, but that style of play could just as likely occur in a "2 legged" set-up. I like the idea that the Supporter's Shield winner always plays at home throughout the tournament.

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now




AUTHORS

ARCHIVES
FOLLOW SOCCERAMERICA

Recent Soccer America Confidential
Il caso Giovinco: Italy's loss is MLS's gain    
Sebastian Giovinco isn't going to the Euros. Italy's loss is MLS's gain. More particularly, Toronto FC ...
Philadelphia Union embarks on its toughest stretch of games to date    
The Philadelphia Union, the Eastern Conference leader, plays in Orlando Wednesday, flies halfway across the country ...
Perry Kitchen finds a new niche in Scotland    
Perry Kitchen left MLS after five seasons though the destination turned out to be somewhat of ...
Howard leaves Everton for a much different MLS and USA    
Is the time right for Brad Guzan to take over as the U.S. No. 1? Both ...
Kamara deal shakes up stagnant Revs    
Nobody can match the production of Kei Kamara since he joined Columbus prior to the 2015 ...
Busy midweek schedules add to unique travel woes in MLS    
No MLS head coach or executive has ever praised the league's schedule-makers. Conflicts with other competitions ...
It's time for Klinsmann to go young    
At first blush, there is nothing startling about the 40-player list from which Jurgen Klinsmann will ...
NYCFC's Pirlo problem won't go away    
Jason Kreis, New York City FC's head coach for its expansion season, never came out and ...
Recent incidents sharpen focus on how video replay can improve the game    
MLS and other North American soccer leagues are awaiting specific guidelines to be issued by FIFA ...
MLS ups the ante on expansion    
Major League Soccer has come a long way in the last decade, let alone the last ...
>> Soccer America Confidential Archives