Join Now  | 
Home About Contact Us Privacy & Security Advertise
Soccer America Daily Soccer World Daily Special Edition Around The Net Soccer Business Insider College Soccer Reporter Youth Soccer Reporter Soccer on TV Soccer America Classifieds Game Report
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalk Soccer America Confidential Youth Soccer Insider World Cup Watch
RSS Feeds Archives Manage Subscriptions Subscribe
Order Current Issue Subscribe Manage My Subscription Renew My Subscription Gift Subscription
My Account Join Now
Tournament Calendar Camps & Academies Soccer Glossary Classifieds
Being Different in an Ocean of Great Players
by Avi Stopper, November 27th, 2008 10AM
Subscribe to Youth Soccer Insider

MOST READ
TAGS:  youth boys

MOST COMMENTED

By Avi Stopper

Every young player knows the feeling. You're playing in a big game and there are college coaches on the sidelines. Every time you do something good, they seem to be looking the other way. Every time you mess up, they're looking right at you.

The question is, how do you get them to pay attention to you long enough to really see what you're capable of? The answer is that you have to be different; you have to do something to stand out from the mass of other players around you.

Don't take this the wrong way. The point isn't that you have to do something miraculous while coaches are watching you. You don't have to have a three bicycle-kick hat trick. Instead, you should focus on "playing your game," doing things the way you normally do them. The time to be different is when you're corresponding with coaches.

Think about it, college coaches are constantly being inundated with emails from prospects. There are only so many emails that they can read that say, "Dear Coach, I really want to play for your team. Really, really, really badly. Sincerely, Mercutio." Yawwwwn. The key is to do and say things that are different. Be honest, but avoid the obvious lines that everyone else is using.

An example might be to say in an email that "My family just got back from Yellowstone National Park. Old Faithful is the best! And I just created a 'Save the Yellowstone Wolves' group on Facebook." Granted, it's a goofy example, but it's something different, something that college coaches haven't read 239 times already today. You might also do something really out of the ordinary, like create a collage of pictures of yourself and the college team and quotes from your friends and coaches saying why you'd be a good fit.

Brainstorming stuff like this is fun. Sit down with a piece of paper and just start writing the goofiest ideas that come to mind. Don't do them all, but do some. Why is this so important? Because college coaches will remember you when they are at your next game. They'll remember the funny card you sent them or the camel-riding picture from when your class went to the zoo. And they'll be more inclined to keep watching you to see what you're really capable of doing as a player.

(Avi Stopperis the founder of CaptainU.com , a software company that walks high school players step-by-step through the college recruiting process.)

 

 

 



No comments yet.

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now




AUTHORS

ARCHIVES
FOLLOW SOCCERAMERICA

Recent Youth Soccer Insider
The College Process: Be Prepared, Proactive and Persistent    
No two children are alike and their dreams are as unique as their goals. As high ...
U.S. girls seek glory in Jordan    
The 2016 U-17 Women's World Cup kicks off on Friday in Jordan, marking the first time ...
Developing smarter players: What we should and shouldn't coach at the younger ages -- and why    
The greatest area for improvement in American youth soccer is in the sophistication of thought and ...
How to coach heading -- NSCAA delivers excellent online course    
Soccer's birth date is widely considered to be Dec. 8, 1863, when the English FA published ...
Rating refs improves officiating    
Just as there are not enough referees to adequately cover every game, there are not enough ...
U.S. U-20 women scoreless in World Cup prep tourney    
Another sign that other nations are catching up with the USA in women's soccer came at ...
In case of emergency -- be ready    
An Emergency Action Plan (EAP) is a written set of systems and processes that are followed ...
Italian-American: Playing youth soccer in Italy    
Until last year, my son was playing for a U.S. Soccer-sanctioned Pre-Development Academy soccer team in ...
Brad Friedel: Youngsters deserve more MLS playing time    
The USA, coached by Tab Ramos, reached the quarterfinals of the 2015 U-20 World Cup, falling ...
Study: Emergency room visits for soccer injuries soar    
Youth soccer-related injuries treated in emergency departments more than doubled from 106 per 10,000 players in ...
>> Youth Soccer Insider Archives