Join Now | 
HomeAboutContact UsPrivacy & SecurityAdvertise
Soccer America DailySoccer World DailySpecial EditionAround The NetSoccer Business InsiderCollege Soccer ReporterYouth Soccer ReporterSoccer on TVSoccer America ClassifiedsGame Report
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalkSoccer America ConfidentialYouth Soccer InsiderWorld Cup Watch
RSS FeedsArchivesManage SubscriptionsSubscribe
Order Current IssueSubscribeManage My SubscriptionRenew My SubscriptionGift Subscription
My AccountJoin Now
Tournament CalendarCamps & AcademiesSoccer GlossaryClassifieds
Mix it up and let players 'train' players
by Sam Snow, August 6th, 2009 10AM

MOST READ

MOST COMMENTED

By Sam Snow

In our youth soccer environment the training sessions tend to be fairly sterile in that the U7 team only practices with the U7 age group, girls only practice with girls, and so forth.

We have evolved into a situation where there's little interaction between age groups and sometimes gender too. By allowing this to continue we devolve our clubs into mere associations of loosely connected teams without allegiance to the club. We also miss out on opportunities for the players to help one another grow in the game.

For example, in soccer times past we had pick-up games with mixed ages and occasionally mixed gender. Nowadays far too much of our training environment is isolated by age group and gender. We are missing out on the chance for older players to help the younger players learn a bit more about playing the game.

Not all teaching of the game comes from coaches nor should it. Players should also learn from watching college, professional and U.S. national team matches. They can also learn from the players in their own soccer club at practices.

The coaching leaders in a club should organize times for older teams to practice with a younger team. The U9 and U10 teams combine in a training session one day for example. The U14 boys team has a practice game vs. the U17 girls team as another example.

From this environment within the club the players help each other grow in the game, they get to know one another better and a feeling of club unity expands. They may also begin to support each other's matches.

If the older players come and cheer now and then for the younger players at one of the matches the impact on self-esteem, confidence and club loyalty will be profound.

When the younger players go to watch a match of an older team in the club the crowd atmosphere improves and the younger players are exposed intimately to a higher level of play.

The older players could attend younger team training sessions to play alongside of them or help coach them or just to be the example of how to do certain ball skills. The possibilities are many if we take advantage of clubs with a full range of age groups developing players from within.

The U12 age group works with the U6 age group. The U14 age group works with the U8 age group. The U16 age group works with the U10 age group. The U19 age group works with the U12 age group. The adult teams work with the U14, U16 and U19 age groups.

Indeed, players 16 years old and older should be encouraged to play on both a youth team and an adult team.

(Sam Snow is the Director of Coaching Education of US Youth Soccer. This article first appeared in U.S. Youth Soccer Blogs, which can be read at http://www.usyouthsoccer.org/Blog.asp)

 



No comments yet.

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now




AUTHORS

ARCHIVES
FOLLOW SOCCERAMERICA

Recent Youth Soccer Insider
USA forced to make late U-20 World Cup roster change     
Five days before the USA faces Myanmar in its U-20 World Cup opener in New Zealand, ...
Teen star Mallory Pugh has her own unique style    
At age 16, Mallory Pugh started all four U.S. games at the 2014 U-20 Women's World ...
The 'Relative Age Effect' -- a Response from U.S. Soccer     
In his 2008 book "Outliers," Malcolm Gladwell popularized the concept of the relative age effect (RAE). ...
Richie Williams on teens turning pro, Bradenton, plus lessons from U-17 qualifying    
The USA earned a spot at the 2015 World Cup with a penalty-kick shootout at win ...
Wenger chimes in on Zelalem; Ramos names Hyndman U-20 captain    
Arsenal coach Arsene Wenger has hinted that 18-year-old Gedion Zelalem, who was recently named to the ...
How to Develop Refs     
When teaching a person how to play golf, if you put the ball on the tee ...
USA gets its Arsenal kid     
As U.S. coach Tab Ramos had hoped, FIFA cleared Arsenal's German-born Gedion Zelalem to play for ...
Effective Goalkeeper Communication -- Coaches Must Teach It     
How goalkeepers communicate with their teammates is a big part of their development.
When Christen Press went from daisy-picking to goal-scoring     
When you see World Cup-bound Christen Press play -- like her golazo against France -- you'd ...
Tab Ramos wants more U-20 firepower     
The top American scorer in U-20 World Cup history? That would be Jozy Altidore, with five ...
>> Youth Soccer Insider Archives