Join Now | 
HomeAboutContact UsPrivacy & SecurityAdvertise
Soccer America DailySoccer World DailySpecial EditionAround The NetSoccer Business InsiderCollege Soccer ReporterYouth Soccer ReporterSoccer on TVSoccer America ClassifiedsGame Report
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalkSoccer America ConfidentialYouth Soccer InsiderWorld Cup Watch
RSS FeedsArchivesManage SubscriptionsSubscribe
Order Current IssueSubscribeManage My SubscriptionRenew My SubscriptionGift Subscription
My AccountJoin Now
Tournament CalendarCamps & AcademiesSoccer GlossaryClassifieds
Finally, four-time champ gets a field of its own
by Ridge Mahoney, February 4th, 2011 12:19AM

TAGS:  houston dynamo, mls


By Ridge Mahoney

It’s taken more than a dozen years and four championships for San Jose/Houston, one of the most successful MLS teams competitively and least appreciated politically, to get a viable stadium project underway.

A ceremonial ground-breaking will be held Saturday, with construction to start soon afterward in an attempt to complete the 22,000-seat facility in April of next year, (though a completion date sometime in June is more likely).

Projected to cost $110 million, the stadium will be located near Minute Maid Park, home to the baseball Astros, and the Houston business district.

To those fans and pundits who think that a team that wins automatically increases its political clout, think again. The only other team to win four league titles, D.C. United, is in a far worse situation.

Operator-investor Anschutz Entertainment Group moved the Clash/Earthquakes to Houston prior to the 2006 season after it deemed the San Jose market and stadium prospects untenable. The team’s inability to either renovate a cramped, antiquated Spartan Stadium or build a suitable replacement drove it east, but moving to Houston presented many of the same problems in different forms.

All manner of ideas of where to play had been presented. Some local officials proposed renovating the ancient Astrodome, formerly home to the baseball Astros, which sat dormant most of the year. For a while it seemed the new team would play in a multisport facility in north Houston designed for high school football and other events. The most obvious and logical choice, Robertson Stadium at the University of Houston, had been used for friendly matches and pre-Libertadores Cup qualifying games to determine Mexican representatives.

Once the first two had been eliminated, serious negotiations began with the University of Houston, whose athletic director at the time, Dave Maggard, wanted a lot of money for usage and maintenance and also for the team to pay for its conversion from grass to artificial turf. The late Doug Hamilton, president/general manager of the Galaxy and AEG’s point man in the move, and
former Houston Sports AuthorityCEO Oliver Luck – hired as team president -- objected to artificial turf, and though they got their way, they seldom got a suitable playing surface.

Players and coaches quietly complained about a dusty, lumpy field that seemingly went for months in the summer and fall without being groomed or watered sufficiently. “They don’t take care of it for us,” said one player, “and they
don’t take care of it for the football team, either.”

A new surface was finally laid at Robertson last year.

Finding a proper practice facility was just as frustrating; players told of being kicked off various fields by the football team – this during spring practice as well, mind you -- and losing out to the college women’s soccer team at another location during the fall.

Field conditions at the Carl Lewis International Complex on the UH campus, the team’s eventual home, deteriorated so badly at the start of the 2010 season the team fled to nearby Rice University.

Playing on bad fields may have caught up with the team last year; though many reasons can be cited for it missing the playoffs for the first time in a decade, a run of injuries surely played a part.

There’s no provision in the current stadium plan for an adjacent training facility, but first things first. If all goes as planned, by next season Houston will be the 13th current MLS team to play in a custom-designed home.

“Obviously, it’s a huge step. We moved six years ago to come down here and get a stadium,” said Dynamo midfielder Brad Davis, who played at the Meadowlands with New York, in the Cotton Bowl with Dallas, and at Spartan with the old Quakes. “It’s taken a little while, but I’m finally happy to say it’s here.

“You can’t do anything about the past, but we are looking forward to this Saturday, and it is a huge step for this organization. This is my 10th year in the league, and I have not played in my own stadium, and there are some other guys here in the same shoes. For me, it's fun.”

  1. Simon Provan
    commented on: February 4, 2011 at 3:57 p.m.
    Though it's called MLS CONFIDENTIAL, there's nothing in this blog post that is CONFIDENTIAL. Anybody who follows MLS knew about everyone of these conflicts and comments, yes, even the unnamed players comments. Come on SA, you can do better than this.
  1. Chuck Stancil
    commented on: February 5, 2011 at 7:57 p.m.
    So Ridge, what's the basis for your comment about June 2012 being a more likely completion date than April 2012? Some insider info that NO ONE else is willing to share or is this based on your expert opinion on stadium construction? Bear in mind that unlike most northern U.S. climates, we CAN build virtually year round in Houston barring the occasional hurricane or "winter" storm. :)
  1. Joe Keenan
    commented on: March 1, 2011 at 12:58 a.m.
    Houston is a two-time champion. While the bulk of the championship squads were members of the San Jose franchise, all records stay in SJ and Houston was designated an expansion team, not a relocated team per MLS. Just as the Ravens in the NFL did not get to take the Browns past achievements and team records with them and the new Browns are considered a continuation of the old Cleveland franchise.

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now



Recent Soccer America Confidential
U.S. national team succession will begin sooner than you might think    
As Jurgen Klinsmann stated in his pre-Concacaf Cup camp interview with U.S. Soccer, Saturday's USA-Mexico game ...
MLS: Best of September    
More brilliance from the Atomic Ant, another top forwar.d robbed by the league's all-time shutout king, ...
Sporting KC isn't about to rest on its impressive laurels    
There is a lot to like about Sporting Kansas City. Its ownership group has built one ...
Does the Open Cup final need a home, too?    
Since closing of the U.S. Soccer Hall of Fame building in Oneonta, N.Y,. five years ago, ...
MLS home teams are winning at a near-record pace    
Has the rapid pace of MLS expansion and corresponding increase in soccer-specific stadiums translated into better ...
MLS stars align at just the right time    
September was a crazy month in MLS. Not once but in two consecutive weeks the top ...
Western Conference race merits attention from all MLS fans, regardless of loyalties    
By expanding its playoff field from five teams per conference to six, MLS has broadened interest ...
The case for and against a summer off    
We should know soon enough whether the Copa Centenario goes ahead as planned -- the final ...
My 23 for Mexico    
Just about every U.S. fan is anxious to see who will be picked to face Mexico ...
Fire plagued with questions in aftermath of latest shakeup    
Who in their right minds would be encouraged by yet another shakeup at the Chicago Fire?
>> Soccer America Confidential Archives