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Group proposes cutbacks in seasons
by Paul Kennedy, November 1st, 2011 4:27PM
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[NCAA]The NCAA's Resource Allocation Working Group is considering wide-ranging cutbacks in college athletics. They include a decrease in the scholarships for the big-money sports of football and basketball but also sweeping changes to the seasons of all sports. Those that would affect soccer would include ...

1. Elimination of non-championship segment competition -- ie. spring season.

2. A 10 percent reduction in regular-season competition for all sports. (If spring season is eliminated, credit would be given for time lost in the spring.)

3. Elimination of all foreign travel.

A student-athlete survey to ask players their opinions of the recommendations has been circulated through athletic departments.

The group's next teleconference will be Friday.



3 comments
  1. B Flow
    commented on: November 2, 2011 at 9:01 a.m.
    I am a former DI athlete at a school with a reputation as an elite academic institution. I am also a former professor at a major research university where I served on the faculty committee that oversees intercollegiate athletics. I certainly understand and accept the need to keep perspective on why we go to college and the place that athletics plays in the life of the university. Yet this decision to cut back on seasons worries me. My sport (not soccer) went from Sept to June (and we trained all summer). I did not have trouble keeping up with school. I am sure there are abusive situations out there, and it is reasonable to put in place protections (i.e., limits on competition and practice time) to insure that students do not have coaches who ask too much. But this is definitely nothing like the norm. And we already have these limits. There is nothing at present standing in the way of success on both the athletic field and the in the classroom. At the university where I was on the faculty, in a BCS conference, the athletes did extremely well in the classroom. In every sport but 2 (I will let you guess which those are), the athletes had better GPA's than the average student, and not just a few but many teams had absolutely remarkable grades. There simply is no inconsistency between being an accomplished athlete and an accomplished student. If you want to be. The athletes do not need additional "protection" beyond what they already have. I know as a student, I would have deeply resented the NCAA taking away from training and competition time. I wanted more, not less. And I was a completely dedicated student as well. Let's not punish all student athletes for the sins of (just a segment of) athletes on two high-profile teams. I suspect this is more about money than anything else, but I am sure it will be presented, at least in part, as a protection for athletes. The result in soccer will be that fewer top players will choose to play college soccer - which would be a perverse result for an institution supposedly motivated by the desire to promote the welfare of student athletes.
  1. cony konstin
    commented on: November 2, 2011 at 10:53 a.m.
    I agree with Super Man. I to believe that our best soccer players should go pro. College soccer should take on a division 3 philosophical approach and that is the players are mainly in college to get an education. Once that approach kicks in at all levels of college soccer than US soccer at the pro level will improve because you will have more players who have the talent to go pro early and bypass college soccer.
  1. Rudy Espindola
    commented on: November 2, 2011 at 10:30 p.m.
    Ric, sorry for bothering but would you please share with all of us uninformed what is the model for division 3 ?

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