Join Now | 
HomeAboutContact UsPrivacy & SecurityAdvertise
Soccer America DailySpecial EditionAround The NetSoccer Business InsiderCollege Soccer ReporterYouth Soccer ReporterSoccer on TVSoccer America Classifieds
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalkSoccer America ConfidentialYouth Soccer InsiderWorld Cup Watch
RSS FeedsArchivesManage SubscriptionsSubscribe
Order Current IssueSubscribeManage My SubscriptionRenew My SubscriptionGift Subscription
My AccountJoin Now
Tournament CalendarCamps & AcademiesSoccer GlossaryClassifieds
Life in Mexico isn't easy for Americans
si.com, January 20th, 2012 3:25PM

MOST READ
TAGS:  african nations cup, mexico

MOST COMMENTED

Mexican soccer offers the possibility for Americans to earn more money than they can in MLS, but they won't find stability as Grant Wahl reports in interviews with Americans DaMarcus Beasley, Herculez Gomez and Marco Vidal about life south of the border.

Beasley is in his first season at Puebla but hasn't been paid since December. Beasley, who had spent seven seasons in Europe, discovered just how bad things were last Friday when he drove to Puebla stadium only to be told by security guards he couldn't enter. The Mexican government had seized the stadium for unpaid taxes. "They took everything, basically," he said.

Gomez has moved on from Puebla, where he starred in 2010, to Pachuca, Estudiantes Tecos and now Santos in Torreon. He had to think twice about the move because Torreon is considered one of the 10 most violent cities in the world. Santos players told him he'd be OK in Torreon, but he describes it as like a ghost town at night. "People aren't really on the streets at night, and for good reason," he said. "There's a lot of worry here with everything going on. So far I haven't felt unsafe, but I also don't turn the TV on."

Vidal, who made a name for himself at now-defunct Indios in Ciudad Juarez, knows all about the crime. He got carjacked driving his 2008 Audi sedan in the border city. The lessons: the police won't do much to help and it doesn't pay to drive around in a nice car. The situation in Ciudad Juarez has deteriorated badly since the Dallas product first moved to Ciudad Juarez, and it has cost him in a big way. The house Vidal bought is worth a lot less than what he paid, and he can't sell it. (He now plays for Leon in the second division.)

Read the original story...


No comments yet.

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now




AUTHORS

ARCHIVES
FOLLOW SOCCERAMERICA

Recent Section 2 Around the Net
World Cup Boosts German Beer Sales    
The World Cup is credited for boosting German beer sales by 4.4 percent in the year's ...
Glazers Selling selling 8 million Man United    
The Glazer family will make around $150 million by selling 8 million shares of its stake ...
Former Palestine Midfielder Killed in Bombing    
Former Palestinian national team player Ahed Zaqout has been killed by an Israeli bomb that hit ...
Neymar Aims to Be Fit for Barcelona Opener    
Brazilian star, Neymar, who fractured a bone in his back following a challenge from Colombia's Juan ...
Mourinho: Lukaku Lacked Motivation    
Chelsea coach Jose Mourinho, after his club sold 21-year-old Belgian striker Romelu Lukaku to Everton for ...
Former Zambia Boss Takes Ivory Coast's Helm    
Frenchman Herve Renard has been appointed coach of Ivory Coast, replacing Sabri Lamouchi, who left after ...
Steven Gerrard: 'Every Person Slips'    
Steven Gerrard says the slip that arguably ended Liverpool's title hopes and England being knocked out ...
La Liga Champ Eying Chicharito    
Mexican striker Javier Hernandez, who started just six Premier League games for Manchester United last season ...
No Charges for Moyes Over Bar Incident    
Former Manchester United coach David Moyes is in the clear after he was investigated over an ...
West Ham Acquires Ecuador World Cup Striker    
West Ham has finalized a $20 million transfer of Ecuador striker Enner Valencia from Mexican club ...
>> Section 2 Around the Net Archives