Join Now | 
HomeAboutContact UsPrivacy & SecurityAdvertise
Soccer America DailySpecial EditionAround The NetSoccer Business InsiderCollege Soccer ReporterYouth Soccer ReporterSoccer on TVSoccer America Classifieds
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalkSoccer America ConfidentialYouth Soccer InsiderWorld Cup Watch
RSS FeedsArchivesManage SubscriptionsSubscribe
Order Current IssueSubscribeManage My SubscriptionRenew My SubscriptionGift Subscription
My AccountJoin Now
Tournament CalendarCamps & AcademiesSoccer GlossaryClassifieds
Hope Solo: 'Free and unburdened on the soccer field'
by Mike Woitalla, September 1st, 2012 3:43AM

MOST READ
TAGS:  high school girls, youth girls

MOST COMMENTED

By Mike Woitalla

Hope Solo's memoir, released days after she helped the USA win gold at the 2012 London Games, debuted at No. 3 on the New York Times bestseller list. The goalkeeper's propensity for controversy and the promise of revealing details from her battles with coaches, teammates (and even a dance partner) undoubtedly boosted sales. The book also provides a glimpse into the youth soccer days of the world's best female goalkeeper.

"Solo: A Memoir of Hope," co-written with Ann Killion, is a PG-13 read that recounts Solo’s troubled childhood -- her house was “a battlefield, a war zone of screaming, swearing, and disrespect”; her father was at times imprisoned and homeless. Soccer provided the sanctuary.

“Life was calm and ordered on the soccer field. … I felt free and unburdened when I was on the soccer field,” writes Solo. “… Luckily for me, I was growing up in a time when active little girls could finally turn to organized sports.”

Her first team, at age 5, was the Pink Panthers, and she found great joy dribbling “through all the other kids” and scoring lots of goals.

In third grade, she joined a different rec team and met her best friend (Cheryl) of the next decade. Rarely did Solo play goalkeeper:

“My strength and aggression were a plus -- I dominated as a forward. Back then, no coach would have dreamed of taking me off the field and sticking me in goal. I was a playmaker. Sure, if our team needed a goalkeeper, I was perfectly willing to fill in for a half -- some kids didn’t have the stomach for it, but I didn’t care. I was fearless. But I was too good an athlete to be stuck in goal.”

In middle school, Solo's team moved up to select soccer. “We were expected to travel to tournaments. And costs were involved, which made it difficult for my family.” But Cheryl’s family and Solo's coaches helped out with transportation and meals on the rode.

Solo was assigned a middle-school paper on what she wanted to be when she grew up. “It was then I decided: I am going to be a professional soccer player. I was dreaming of something that didn’t exist.”

At 13, she went to an Eastern Washington ODP tryout, hoping to impress as a forward. But goalkeepers were in short supply. The ODP coaches were aware of Solo’s goalie skills because she had shone during a club tournament in Oregon when she had filled in for her team’s injured keeper. At the ODP gathering, she was placed in goal with the U-16s.

For club and high school, Solo remained a field player, but she climbed the ODP ranks as a keeper and started getting attention from college coaches. When her mother was laid off from her job at the Hanford nuclear production complex, and her stepfather on disability, they were set to file for bankruptcy and told Solo she couldn’t continue with ODP. “It’s just very expensive,” her mother said.

Solo saw her dream of college ball collapsing:

“If I couldn’t play ODP, if I couldn’t get a college scholarship, I was going to be stuck in Richland [Wash.] my entire life. I was probably going to end up at Hanford, cleaning up nuclear waste.”

What she didn’t know was that members of her community were already chipping in to cover her club and ODP costs. Her coaches helped her raise money for ODP and eventually she received aid from state and regional programs.

She entered the national team program at the U-17 level and played college ball at the University of Washington. She played pro ball in WUSA, Sweden, France and WPS, has appeared in 124 games for the USA, and owns two Olympic gold medals.

"Solo: A Memoir of Hope," by Hope Solo with Ann Killion. Hardcover, 304 pages, HarperCollins 2012.



2 comments
  1. Jose Melero
    commented on: September 1, 2012 at 3:31 p.m.
    While I have not read the book, this excerpt points to a frequent problem; talented players who cannot afford club teams, camps, ODP and the associated travel and overnight stays, etc. I used to be naive in thinking that kids that moved away from AYSO and recreation programs were the best players; I have since learned that they are better players who happen to have the money to afford to be on that team. I don't know what the answer is, but there has to be a more economical way, where talented players can move up the ranks and not have to have a lot of money also. Every year, our family hosts a soccer camp, where coaches come from other countries; they consistently tell me that they did not have coaches until they were 11 or 12, their education in soccer came from playing and playing often. Here our solution is: Send us your 7 year old and a minimum of $1,000 per season and our experienced coaches with a lot of expensive certifications, will make them into good players. This problem is slowly changing, as soccer gains popularity and players in the USA play around with their friends in the yard, street or open green patch of grass; just like in other soccer crazy countries. I'm afraid that the big money mentality will continue and our national team will continue to only see the talented players that can afford to get on the teams that can get them to the academies. Hope Solo's community should be commended for their effort to raise money to send her to ODP! This is one of two inspirational stories in this book.

  1. James Madison
    commented on: September 1, 2012 at 7:54 p.m.
    In addition to her wonderful goalkeeping, I love Solo's strong resemblance to Kim Novak, one of my favorite actresses.


Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now




AUTHORS

ARCHIVES
FOLLOW SOCCERAMERICA

Recent Youth Soccer Insider
Kevin Payne (Q&A, Part 2): Competing groups create dynamism    
Longtime MLS executive Kevin Payne served as D.C. United president during its golden years of the ...
'Clubs are the building blocks' (Kevin Payne Q&A, Part 1)    
Longtime MLS executive Kevin Payne served as D.C. United president during its golden years of the ...
Reffing the Problem Player     
You and I, and truly all of humanity, have a wonderful potential to make a difference ...
High School vs. Club: Can this storm be sent out to sea?    
This soccer storm, with some collaboration and communication, can be blown out to sea or it ...
Six Reasons Parents Should Not Watch Practice     
The idea for this article struck me as I sat in my car after dropping off ...
Building club affinity: One surefire method to bond members    
Tony DiCicco: 'We should be excellent in every position'    
Tony DiCicco coached the USA to crowns at the 1996 Olympics, 1999 Women's World Cup and ...
Ref Watch: Player Pass Check Provides Chance to Make a Good First Impression    
You never get a second chance to make a first impression. For referees of youth soccer ...
Tab Ramos Q&A: Qualifying brings invaluable experience    
The USA qualified for the U-20 World Cup for the second straight time during the tenure ...
Tackling Key Challenges in Modern Day Youth Ball    
I was part of a panel at the US Youth Soccer Workshop at the NSCAA Convention: ...
>> Youth Soccer Insider Archives