Join Now | 
HomeAboutContact UsPrivacy & SecurityAdvertise
Soccer America DailySoccer World DailySpecial EditionAround The NetSoccer Business InsiderCollege Soccer ReporterYouth Soccer ReporterSoccer on TVSoccer America ClassifiedsGame Report
Paul Gardner: SoccerTalkSoccer America ConfidentialYouth Soccer InsiderWorld Cup Watch
RSS FeedsArchivesManage SubscriptionsSubscribe
Order Current IssueSubscribeManage My SubscriptionRenew My SubscriptionGift Subscription
My AccountJoin Now
Tournament CalendarCamps & AcademiesSoccer GlossaryClassifieds
MLS Disciplinary Committee works in mysterious ways
by Paul Gardner, April 4th, 2014 8:23PM

TAGS:  mls, referees


By Paul Gardner

The lack of transparency in the MLS disciplinary procedures continues to irritate me. I would have thought that it would also be a matter of some concern to MLS as well. But apparently not.

We are still getting regular weekly communications from the MLS Disciplinary Committee (DisCo), setting out whatever measures they have taken to punish, or increase the punishment of, players guilty of various offenses.

These reports are good, as far as they go. Which is not far enough. To start with, we are not told who it is who is making the judgments and handing out the punishment. The names of the DisCo’s five members are kept secret.

Why? Because, we are told by MLS, that enables the members to do their work free from the pressure that they would surely suffer if their names were made public. A further reason for the anonymity is a fear by MLS that it would be difficult to find people (they are ex-players, ex-coaches and ex-referees) willing to take on the job if they felt their names were to be published.

The same clandestine atmosphere surrounds the workings of the Independent Review Panel that rules on appeals by clubs against red-card decisions. Again, we are not allowed to know who the members of this Panel are -- we’re simply told that the panel consists of one representative from the U.S. Soccer Federation, Canadian Soccer Association, and Professional Referees Organization (PRO).

In addition to hiding the identity of its members, the DisCo can also be accused of not leveling with us when it reports its findings. All we get is a record of what actions it has taken. But we need to know more. We need to know which game incidents it chose to investigate -- all of them.

Which will automatically tell us which incidents are not considered worth looking at. If the DisCo does investigate an incident but decides not to take any action, we need to know about that, and the reasoning behind the decision.

In a recent column I focused on three incidents of what I considered to be reckless play that occurred in the Red Bulls-Chivas USA game played on March 30. I suggested they should be looked at by the Disco. This was not a frivolous request. Two of the incidents involved elbow-to-head clashes. Concussion territory -- an area where you would expect MLS to show great caution. I considered that the referee in this game, Juan Guzman, treated the incidents too lightly.

Did the DisCo look at these incidents? I have no way of knowing. If they did, then I do know that they decided to take no action, because the incidents did not feature in the DisCo weekly report. But I think the committee members should be required to explain their decisions, regardless of whether they condemn or absolve a player.

I am suggesting that Guzman should have yellow-carded both offenders. He did not caution either of them. So my criticism is firstly of the players for reckless play, and ultimately of the referee for being too lenient. But the DisCo is not in the business of punishing referees.

The IRP might implicitly discipline a referee by overturning a red card. But the IRP has a problem in dealing with referees. IRP goes so far as to include the world “independent” in its name. But one of its three members is “a representative of the Professional Referees Organization (PRO).” PRO occupies office space at MLS headquarters in Manhattan, and is largely financed by MLS. And we are being asked to believe that PRO is an independent body?

There is just too much secrecy involved in the decision-making of these two bodies, the DisCo and the IRP. In the incidents investigated, all the participants are identifiable -- the referee, the players, maybe coaches -- and open to pressure and possible abuse. Well, I‘m afraid that’s part of the game nowadays. It does not seem right to me that the MLS panel members should be protected from this slice of reality.

This is not a country where the idea of secret tribunals sits well. The phrase “not only must justice be done it must also be seen to be done” applies perfectly here. FIFA has come to realize, over the past few years, that a lack of transparency can cause serious problems.

We need to know the make up of these two bodies. Who are the individuals who are handing down the judgments? What are the criteria for being on these panels? Who selects the members? Are there any conflicts of interest? Do members recuse themselves if there are? It would greatly interest me to know about the ex-players. Are they -- can both of them be -- defenders? Because defenders and attackers usually have rather different angles on contentious plays.

While MLS wrestles with the problem of allowing us to know who its secret panel members are, it can take one important step toward transparency by giving us a full report every week from the DisCo -- to include all those cases it decided not to investigate, all the cases it did investigate but decided to take no action, plus the reasoning for each decision.

  1. feliks fuksman
    commented on: April 5, 2014 at 5:38 a.m.
    Very good points made by Mr PG. We have had enough scandals with FIFA recently, with dont need them here in MLS. People, committees should be responsible and accountable for their actions or lock of it.
  1. Glenn Auve
    commented on: April 5, 2014 at 11 a.m.
    I agree that just as important as the extra discipline the DisCo hands out would be to hear why they haven't done anything about myriad other incidents. The inconsistency and lack of transparency are very troubling.
  1. Kent James
    commented on: April 5, 2014 at 12:49 p.m.
    Paul, you had me until you singled out defenders as automatically unable to discipline players. ALL DEFENDERS ARE NOT THUGS (and the corollary, all offensive players are not angels). I would hope players would be chosen to be on the disciplinary committee because of for knowledge, experience, and character, not their positions.
  1. Frank Cardone
    commented on: April 6, 2014 at 9:41 a.m.
    Paul G is on-target here from start to finish. The concept of a DisCo is a good and necessary one but its implementation fall short because of the reasons he cites. One more thing: I feel the typical punishment decided upon by the Committee is usually too lenient.
  1. Peter Skouras
    commented on: April 12, 2014 at 12:29 p.m.

Sign in to leave a comment. Don't have an account? Join Now



Recent SoccerTalk with Paul Gardner
Time is running out on violent goalkeeping     
Employing former players as TV experts is now well established as the thing to do. Like ...
Joe Morrone: Soccer's Determined Pioneer    
Joe Morrone. I have quite a few memories of Joe, all of them pleasant and friendly. ...
Should PRO have revealed, during the game, that the Red Bull trick play was illegal?    
This really rather ridiculous business of the Red Bull corner-kick trickery continues to reverberate.
Trickery, incompetence and ignorance -- the tale of a Red Bulls corner kick     
So the Red Bulls got away with one against Chicago last week -- their use of ...
It's time for FIFA to move out of the Alps    
It has occurred to me at regular intervals during the past decades that one of the ...
Beware the banalysts and the blight of banalysis     
The usual tripe from the TV commentators this past weekend: "The more they can get the ...
Soccer and Metrics (Part 2): A troubled partnership     
OK then. The aim of metrics in soccer is to improve player performance. After that, the ...
Soccer and Metrics (Part 1): Beyond the marketing silliness     
Now here's a nice example of the extravagances, the exaggerations the deceptions, and, yes, the downright ...
Impeding the goalkeeper, tackling from behind -- difficulties of definition    
The new FIFA Rule book for 2015-2016 presents the usual problem. What has been changed? The ...
A Soccer Rarity -- A Triumph for Common Sense    
There are three heroes in this story -- though heroes is really much too dramatic a ...
>> SoccerTalk with Paul Gardner Archives