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Money Matters: MLS's most-valuable goal producers
by Paul Kennedy, April 28th, 2017 4:34AM
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TAGS:  mls, montreal impact, orlando city, seattle sounders

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With the release of 2017 MLS player salaries by the MLS Players Union, it's time to look at who have been the most productive players through the first eight weeks of the season.

The obvious choice for the most productive player is Orlando City's Cyle Larin, who has scored six goals, all on guaranteed compensation of only $192,000 a year.

But the most productive player -- guaranteed compensation divided by goals and assists -- is Montreal's Anthony Jackson-Hamel, who is making $66,150 -- just above the senior minimum salary of $65,000 -- and has already scored three goals.



The other player listed at making less than $100,000 a year but already contributing three or more goals is Seattle left back Joevin Jones, who has three assists for the Sounders. The T&T international earns only $96,166 in guaranteed compensation, making him one of the biggest bargains in the league.

MLS's most-valuable goal producers:

AVERAGE (RANK) PLAYER, TEAM, GUAR. COMP. (SCORING)
$22,050 (1) Anthony Jackson-Hamel, Montreal $66,150 (3 goals)
$32,000 (2) Cyle Larin, Orlando City $192,000 (6 goals)
$32,055 (3) Joevin Jones, Seattle $96,166 (3 assists)
$33,333 (4) Michael Barrios, FC Dallas $100,000 (1 goal, 2 assists)
$37,500 (5) Yamil Asad, Atlanta United $150,000 (2 goals, 2 assists)
$38,333 (6) Emmanuel Boateng, LA Galaxy $115,000 (1 goal, 2 assists)
$41,250 (7) Patrice Bernier,  Montreal $165,000 (4 assists)
$42,500 (8) Alex, Houston, $170,000 (4 assists)
$54,792 (9) Justin Meram, Columbus $328,750.00 (4 goals, 2 assists)
$55,167 (10) Jack Harrison, New York FC, $165,500 (2 goals, 1 assist)
$56,875 (11) Johan Venegas, Minn. Utd. $227,500 (2 goals, 2 assists)
$57,500 (12) Luke Mulholland, Real Salt Lake $172,500 (2 goals, 1 assist)
$60,000 (13) CJ Sapong, Philadelphia $300,000 (4 goals, 1 assist)
$65,417 (14) Christian Ramirez, Minn. Utd. $392,504.40 (5 goals, 1 assist)
$67,084 (15) Kevin Molino, Minn. Utd. $402,504 (3 goals, 3 assists)
Average=guaranteed compensation divided by goals and assists.
Note: Minimum total of 3 goals and assists.



17 comments
  1. Quarterback TD
    commented on: April 28, 2017 at 10:31 a.m.
    Sometimes it's not the number of goals or assist but the impact the player has on the field. There are times great players like Neymar would have droughts for weeks but their impact in the games were high. Even Messi was nonexistent in the European championship league. I cannot confirm but I don't think he scored anything in the final 16 but he had a high impact because he draws a large number of defender on him and free up others to score. On the contrary a high scorer could be a problem if the team is losing and that players is taking way too many goalless shots as oppose to getting his teammates involve in a better percentage opportunity. So he may be scoring 4 when as a team they should be scoring 24 and winning more game. It's something the coaches need to look at.
  1. Fire Paul Gardner Now
    commented on: April 30, 2017 at 10:52 a.m.
    What's the "European Championship League"? Do you mean the Champions League? If you are referring to Barca's games against PSG, you are wrong yet again. Messi did in fact score in the 6-1 game. Did you know you can easily look up things like this to avoid future errors in your posts?
  1. I w Nowozeniuk
    commented on: April 28, 2017 at 10:47 a.m.
    QTD, really? It's the players that make things happen that are the team contributors, whether goal scorers or play-makers. Your example of Messi /Neymar in the CL is meaningless, they din't advance because they were beaten by a better squad of players that make things happen.
  1. Quarterback TD
    commented on: April 28, 2017 at 2:24 p.m.
    Are you insane ?? Who in Juventus is better than Neymar and Messi ? Also in the second game did you look at the final statistics on ball possession, shots on goal etc ? Barcelona totally dominated.. The best squad did not win the second game the best squad failed to finish and lost.. get your facts straight.. The man of the match was Neymar but I think it was the Juventus keeper.. in addition my initial comment about Neymar was him playing in La Liga during the October to November timeframe and Messi was strictly durin the Champions league.. Read the post correctly before talking nonsense.
  1. Fire Paul Gardner Now
    commented on: May 1, 2017 at 9:45 a.m.
    He didn't say Juventus have better players than Messi and Neymar, he said Juventus have the better team. Which they do, this year at least.
  1. frank schoon
    commented on: April 28, 2017 at 1:24 p.m.
    TD, I W , BOTH YOU GUYS ARE RIGHT AND WRONG. IT IS NOT THAT EASY TO EXPLAIN. BOTH PLAYERS HAVE EXTREME QUALITIES FOR THAT MAKES THEM THE PLAYERS THEY ARE. NEYMAR IS NOT A GOAL GETTER LIKE MESSI. BUT BOTH NEED HELP FROM THEIR TEAMMATES TO SCORE, FOR EXAMPLE XAVI AT ONE TIME WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR MUCH OF MESSI'S SUCCESS, JUST LIKE THEIR TEAMMATES CREATING SPACE BY DRAWING AWAY DEFENDERS TO CREATE SPACE FOR MESSI AND NEYMAR TO OPERATE IN. AND THERE ARE TIMES BOTH ,DUE TO THEIR EXTREME QUALITIES BOTH CAN CREATE FOR THEMSELVES THE CHANCE TO SCORE. THEIR DEARTH OF SCORING ALSO IS A RESULT DUE TO THE LACK OF RHYTHM OF THE TEAM AND ALONG WITH THE PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS TAKING PART. THEIR BACK LINE IS NOT WHAT IT ONCE WAS AND THAT CAUSES PROBLEMS FOR THE FRONT LINE AS WELL. (SORRY FOR THE CAPS) AND ALSO AFTER 3YEARS WITH THE SAME COACH THINGS TEND TO DETERIORATE
  1. Quarterback TD
    commented on: April 28, 2017 at 2:16 p.m.
    Frank, thanks for the explanation. Today is such a nice day I really try to put things as simple as possible for people like "I W.. blah blah blah" to understand but obviously it did not work.. Anyway bottom line is numerous teams had to shed their top scores in order to win championships. Golden Boot does not equate to winning championships.
  1. Nick Daverese
    commented on: April 29, 2017 at 7:09 a.m.
    Are they still counting secondary assists as assists. A pass that leads to another pass is not a real assist. A pass that leads to a goal is an assist. What is the real purpose of a secondary assists? Oh yes to pad a players stats to make one belieave he is a valuable player to his team and to get him more money. There are very few real playmakers in football today. Paul Scholes was a player I loved to watch play. Also loved to watch Carlos Valderama these guys were play makers. Every pass they made could lead to a goal a pleasure to watch them play.
  1. frank schoon
    commented on: April 29, 2017 at 7:36 a.m.
    Nick, so much of this stuff is such a joke. Stats are meaningless when it comes down to judging a player. To me it comes down to whether there was an idea or plan behind the pass given. Notice how often there are 50/50 duels as a result from a pass, which means passes aren't well thought out, instead the pass given is just willy-nilly. Players are given credit for an assist when they cross the ball into a crowd and someone somehow heads the ball in for a goal. An assist leading to a goal has as much to do with good positioning off the ball by the player who scores, but this is never brought up or talked about.
  1. Bob Ashpole
    commented on: May 1, 2017 at 12:37 a.m.
    I agree about stats being useless compared to actually watching play. I just wanted to talk about my view of the importance of the buildup leading to assists and goals. Coaches look for the players who are consistently involved in a teams goals. For want of a better term, I will call them "breakout" passes. Often the "breakout" passer has the vision and execution that creates the opportunity that is exploited by the final pass and finish. The higher you go up the soccer pyramid, the more important the buildup play is. Frank credited the importance of Xavi earlier to Barca's attacking success. Exactly.
  1. Bob Ashpole
    commented on: May 1, 2017 at 12:42 a.m.
    As a midfielder, if I was involved in most or all of my team's goals, I felt I had a good night. Who did or didn't get credit for an assist didn't matter.
  1. Nick Daverese
    commented on: April 29, 2017 at 7:51 a.m.
    Your right Frank you have to put some thought behind your pass. Trick is to do that without taking the time to think. Put the pass where you think the receiver would put the ball on his first touch. So the receiver can either immediately shoot, or pass or dribble. I used to see Valderama get mad at a team mate who did not make the right move before Valderama made his pass. Now that is thinking a head.
  1. Nick Daverese
    commented on: April 29, 2017 at 7:56 a.m.
    On crosses a lot of players make crosses like they were machines. If you see no one there to put in a cross you hold the ball till they are. Or you can back pass then maybe that player can make a good cross to a second or third player you could not hit with a cross. Teaching when how how to cross is a complicated subject to be worked on over a lot of practices not just in one or two.
  1. I w Nowozeniuk
    commented on: April 30, 2017 at 6:13 p.m.
    Bloggers don't realize the sphere of Messi's Soccer IQ...he makes everyone with a good Soccer IQ even better. How many times does he give away the ball compared to Neymar et al? How much space does he create for his strikers et al?
  1. Nick Daverese
    commented on: May 1, 2017 at 10:46 a.m.
    Some dribblers dribble more up right then others. They just bend the knees to get closer to the grown. Those kind of dribblers have better control of there bodies then others when they dribble. Messi is one of those.
  1. R2 Dad
    commented on: May 1, 2017 at 7:42 p.m.
    Cyle Larin has been discussed as a man-of-the-match type player, dangerous, a goal-scorer. Is it really possible that Orlando is so over-stocked with these types of players that they're just letting him sit there on that measly salary, awaiting a transfer request to some other league? Who is driving the bus in MLS? Is it because he's Canadian and no one cares?
  1. don Lamb
    commented on: May 2, 2017 at 8:31 a.m.
    I'm not quite sure what you are implying. Are you saying that Orlando is dumb because they are in danger of seeing Larin go to Europe since they are not paying him enough? It is common knowledge that Larin wants to play in Europe, and it is only a matter of time before that happens. There is a slight possibility that OCity would try to sign him for a longer term so that they can sell him for a higher price, but it is clear that they and everyone else know that Larin is heading across the Atlantic as soon as a good offer comes along. Preventing that would be a huge disservice to the player and would ultimately be pointless since he will do it on his own terms once his contract is over if necessary.

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