What We're Reading

Dein Offers an Olive Branch to FIFA over Player Compensation

t would seem that FIFA and the domestic organizations that govern soccer in countries across Europe are perennially at odds, desperately in need of some peacemaking. Yesterday, at Soccerex, the sport's annual business convention, Arsenal vice chairman David Dein staked his claim to be the man to bridge that gap. For one thing, he suggested that the legal disputes between FIFA and Newcastle United, Charleroi, and Inter Milan, who are all backed by the European club alliance G14, could soon be resolved without court interference. The clubs want compensation from soccer's governing body when their players are seriously injured on international duty. Newcastle strike Michael Owen is a perfect example. Injured while playing for England against Sweden at this summer's World Cup, FIFA only compensates Newcastle for half of his nearly $200,000-per-week salary. Dein suggested that FIFA and UEFA take out an insurance policy on expensive players during major tournaments so they could compensate clubs in full, while letting them foot the bill for international friendlies and minor competitions. It's unclear what FIFA president Sepp Blatter thought of Dein's speech, but separately, Blatter stated his wish to see six domestically produced players in every starting eleven, an idea that Dein and Chelsea chief executive Peter Kenyon (and likely, many other G14 members) instantly dismissed.

Read the whole story at The Guardian »

Next story loading loading..