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Gulati's Search Far From Over

Before the World Cup, when Bruce Arena and Landon Donovan graced the cover of several magazines and newspapers, being coach of the U.S. national team seemed like one of the most exciting jobs in the world. "Every coach in the business would want to coach the U.S. because we have money, we're top 10 in the world, and we're getting better," ESPN analyst Shep Messing said earlier in the year. Since the World Cup, America's ranking has plummeted, and with it, the world's esteem, as Juergen Klinsmann turned down an offer that everyone in the world knew he would be getting. Neither he nor the U.S. Soccer Federation has been willing to clarify the reasons why the two camps weren't able to come to an agreement. Now, says Gulati, "We'll make a decision in a time frame that will be pushed back to springtime." Poor Bob Bradley. He's the "interim" coach, a euphemism for "emergency replacement"-kind of like a lame duck president who never quite had a chance. Oh, and the light at the end of the tunnel for him is, awkwardly, to assume control of the Olympic team. How long does Bradley have? Six months? Gulati says it could be shorter or longer. "Is Bob a potential candidate? He would be," he says. "His track record speaks for himself. I'm very comfortable that we are leaving our national team and our Olympic program in very safe hands." That means that we already have an Olympic coach without a national team head coach-something that a Gerard Houllier or a Jose Pekerman might not appreciate. Aside from Klinsmann, the remaining group of five finalists are still apparently in the running, two of which are internationally based, according to Gulati. That means either Pekerman, Houllier or Man United assistant Carlos Queiroz.

Read the whole story at ESPN Soccernet »

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