Under-20 World Cup: Costly tie gives USA group title

The USA won Group F at the Under-20 World Cup thanks to ties in both games on the final day of group play, but the 1-1 tie with Saudi Arabia was costly. Cameron Carter-Vickers was red carded and Aaron Herrera and Derrick Jones received yellow cards, ruling all three players out of Thursday's game against New Zealand in the round of 16.



Stats:
USA // SAUDI ARABIA
Possession: 49% / 51%
Shots: 9 / 12
Saves: 4 / 1
Fouls:14 / 18

As it did in its 2-1 win over Ecuador, Saudi Arabia was dangerous on the counter in the opening minutes, creating two dangerous chances before the USA settled down.

The USA went ahead in the 40th minute when 18-year-old Tyler Adams and 17-year-old Josh Sargent, the two youngest players in the U.S. lineup, teamed up to feed Luca De la Torre for an open shot that was stopped by Saudi keeper Amin Albukhari, but Brooks Lennon was open at the back post to put away the rebound.

By then, Peruvian referee Diego Haro had stamped his mark on the game with six yellow cards -- three to the USA and three to the Saudis -- but a seventh card for a foul by Carter-Vickers on an aerial challenge in the 45th minute was the Tottenham defender's second of the game.

Justen Glad replaced Real Salt Lake teammate Sebastian Saucedo to start the second half, and the U.S. defense, anchored by captain Erik Palmer-Brown, kept the Saudis at bay until the late stages.

In the 74th minute, Abdulelah Alamri rose to head home the equalizer off a corner kick to even the score.

USA U-20 group titles:
2003 --> Round of 16: 2-0 vs. Ivory Coast
2005 --> Round of 16: 1-3 vs. Italy
2007 --> Round of 16: 3-1 vs Uruguay
2017 --> Round of 16: vs. New Zealand

Another Saudi goal would have won the group for the Asian representatives, but the tie was good enough to give the USA the group win and send Saudi Arabia into the round of 16, knocking out six-time champion Argentina.

The USA would have finished second and had to play Mexico in the round of 16, but Senegal had a goal disallowed by VAR and had to settle for a 0-0 tie with Ecuador.

May 28 in Daejeon
USA 1 Saudi Arabia 1. Goals: Lennon 40; Alamri 74.
USA -- Klinsmann, Acosta, Carter-Vickers, Palmer-Brown, Herrera; Jones, Adams, Saucedo (Glad 46), De la Torre (Williamson 89), Lennon; Sargent (Sabbi 70).
Saudi Arabia -- Albukhari, Zabbani (Almuwallad 73), Alamri, Alnaji, Alsamiri (Alrashidi 58), Alkhulaif, Alyami, Altambakti, Alasmari, Aldosari, Tarmin (Kireiri 68).
Yellow Cards: USA -- Herrera 8, Jones 32, Carter-Vickers 40, Carter-Vickers 45; Saudi Arabia -- Aldosari 23, Alnaji 30, Tarmin 33, Alamri 65.
Red Card: USA -- Carter-Vickers 45.
Referee: Diego Haro (Peru).
Att.: 5,460.

Schedule, Round of 16:
MAY 30
Venezuela-Japan (Game 37)
South Korea-Portugal (38)
MAY 31
Uruguay-Saudi Arabia (41)
England-Costa Rica (39)
Zambia-Germany (40)
JUNE 1
Mexico-Senegal (42)
France-Italy (43)
USA-New Zealand (44)

38 comments about "Under-20 World Cup: Costly tie gives USA group title".
  1. Mitch Mitchy, May 28, 2017 at 9:15 a.m.

    Whats the point of having video review(which is awful)
    if you don't use it on the red card? Perfect header by CCV. Disgraceful.

  2. R2 Dad replied, May 28, 2017 at 2:56 p.m.

    The league can retroactively rescind the suspension for league play--not sure that applies to tournaments.

  3. Bob Ashpole replied, May 28, 2017 at 3:28 p.m.

    What bothers me is that the referee was in position and didn't see any foul. The call had to have come from someone 60 yards away with an obstructed view. Not from the video ARs either. The call happened too fast for that.

  4. frank schoon, May 28, 2017 at 12:31 p.m.

    Let me first say the refereeing stunk or rather this guy was not experienced enough in the finer details. This is why I prefer refs who have really played the game, and I don't mean "coed soccer" on saturday nights, but those who have played seem to have a better or six sense to know or feel the game. I quit watching this game right after the red card. The goal we scored was meaningless as far as relating to how we played, which was bad. First of all, our academies are not teaching our players how to pass medium range passes HARD, employing the "instep" ,instead you see all our players pass with the inside of the foot, which is so old-fashioned and not effective,and inefficient. It is inefficient for it doesn't create time and space for the player receiving the ball.
    Argentina players set a perfect example of how to pass with the instep. I can listen to a CD of just the sound of the passes these Argentinian players make when passing with the instep. Watching the Saudi Arabians they have such a nice touch on the ball and most importantly, they have better handling skills than our players when it comes to playing in small spaces under pressure. Look how they are able to pass the around
    in such "swinging' manner. We lack that element. I don't understand that this country as creative a culture we are where so many countries enamored of our creativity in arts, technology and sports, we produce uninspiring, programmed, stiff-like, grey mice for soccer players. One of the problems is our developmental program is run by 'stiffs' themselves. Get your "A" coaching license and go to this workshop,blah, blah, blah and you can join AD program in developing players. If I ran one of these AD programs, I would kick everybody out who had license and bring in people who can do something with a ball, besides talking with your mouth,following the doctrinaire garbage of these coaching classes. If you study the Arab experience, they former greats, retired players, like XAVI, Brazilian stars, other greats bringing good coaches who have done something in the world coaching to train and develop these players. Who do we have teaching and coaching our players at the academies...JOE BLOW, with a license, who has played some college ball, some MLS, or he just worked his way through the coaching license factory or some we have real secret weapon 'Bradenton". Not to mention we employ english trainers/coaches at these academies too, of which I have no idea WHY? England is not known for YOUTH DEVELOPMENT, as a matter of fact if it weren't for all the foreign players in the EPL, english would be a joke. England has produced only two great players, Stanley Matthews, and Bobby Charlton. Although they have invented the game, they have given no inspiration or new ideas to soccer. If I were to invest in building ships, let us say, why would I bring in engineers from a landlocked country to carry out this investment. See following post.

  5. Bob Ashpole replied, May 28, 2017 at 3:29 p.m.

    All those soft yellows reminded me of the Italian scandals.

  6. R2 Dad replied, May 28, 2017 at 3:37 p.m.

    re: officiating. This center decided to call a tight match, but this works best when you do lots of talking to the players to keep them in check--that's the thinking anyway. If the center can't speak both languages it becomes difficult to execute. Combined with the fact that neither team wanted to play contact-free ball, and this center made himself the focus of the match. Maybe this is normal for Peruvian officials, but FIFA-rated officials do not typically exhibit this type of narcissism. I thought only 2 of the cards were warranted. Perhaps FIFA will lift the red card suspension but I don't think that's SOP at youth tournaments unless they've recently changed it.

  7. frank schoon replied, May 28, 2017 at 3:59 p.m.

    R2, I hope so too...

  8. frank schoon replied, May 28, 2017 at 4 p.m.

    Yeah, Bob, it is shame about the Ref.

  9. frank schoon, May 28, 2017 at 1:12 p.m.

    Look at Lennon, he went to England, and was with the Liverpool academy. The worst thing for his development was to go to England. All he has become is a flank runner, with no creative 1v1 skills. He works hard, but it is all blue collar stuff, very uninspiring like so many of our players end up becoming. Of course when you watch Liverpool play(which I can only take about 20min watching) you can understand why Lennon is the way he is. I think Lennon can be employed as a back, a left back in the back. Since teams today, tend to have their wings cut inside ,instead of penetrating down to the end line and cross the ball, Lennon because he is quick and able to defend and he can tackle with right leg on the left side, which he can't do it the wing decides to go to the end line for cross. On other words Lennon should become a back...
    In this game Sargent should have moved back about 10 to 15 yards, for this way the 2 center backs wouldn't have known what to do, cover him or should a midfielder cover. Either way , Sargent would have created more space for himself bring in doubt who should cover him.
    Another problem I see that we continually pass to the our back on the flanks who are standing still waiting for the ball. There only two reasons a back should receive the ball on the flank. One, that he is making an attacking run, and two that the pass to the back is in manner that it beats an opponent. But so often he standing there along the sidelines waiting for the ball, which is not what you want him to do. This is another example of how the Academies are not doing a good job of teaching our players for they themselves don't how teach "how to build up an attack". So often you see the back line giving square balls to each other from one side to the other and then end up kicking long down field, which tells me the positioning at midfield is not good.
    Our passing is way to slow, especially in the backfield. Jones in the middle is the only one who put some power in his ground pass, although ,again, he uses the inside of the foot, not the instep. If you take Senegal with their explosive speed ,size and technique and combine it with the style of play the Saudis exhibited , can imagine what they would have done in this tournament. If we only had half the ball handling skills of the Saudis, can you imagine how more powerful we would become. We have speed, we have fight, we need the brains and technical dexterity. The last two attributes ,I'm afraid, is not being taught by our AD, for they lack that ability themselves.
    These programmed 'A' licensed coaches are better at giving coaching, training lessons for 'Table Fussball' since our players look and play like these puppets on the bar. I entire lay the blame of the lack good development at the AD's door. Our players could be so much better

    .

  10. Bob Ashpole, May 28, 2017 at 3:23 p.m.

    Frank, I agree with your comments about the game and the tactics. As for your comments about player development, I don't know enough to say anything other than the US needs to be better technically and positionally. In particular I was watching our DM. My conclusion was that he was too slow tactically including his passing which was inaccurate enough that it slowed down the next player. He was relying on his size and strength rather than skill. I too saw that our passing was much too slow. Conventional thinking these days is to pass on the ground with the inside of the foot. It is just too slow. Even my amateur rec teams passed above the ground when we needed speed and accuracy. On the short passes the ball would be brushing the top of the grass. You can tell it is off the ground by the way the ball travels. Repeat, even my amateur rec team.

  11. frank schoon replied, May 28, 2017 at 4:16 p.m.

    Bob, you are right on when it comes to the DM. These insight detail could have been taught by DM out of Europe, technically and tactically, but it is not. Another perfect example of how an almost 20 year old still have not been taught...AND WHOSE FAULT IS THAT..DA

  12. frank schoon, May 28, 2017 at 3:58 p.m.

    BOB, It is fine to use the inside of the foot to pass the ball for short range,like 10 or 15 yards or so, or a hard one-touch but when it involves 25 yards ,medium range passes you have to employ the instep for that is even much faster than what you mention of passing slightly off the ground.
    On development of the players, they all look and play the same. Why can't we produce some nice ball handers, it is certainly not due to our athleticism or lack thereof. They all look the same, programmed and will give you 100% effort. If you study Saudi Arabia and what they have done , they always brought in famous players who just retired like Xavi and many others and well known coaches who have earned their spurs in the world of soccer. Look at all the well known foreign players who played here over the past 20 years...NOT ONE, has helped us or has been asked by us. In Japan they had dutch coaches, also Brazilian like Zico. These types of people have so much insight knowledge of the game that could help our player development...It is just incredible we don't do that. I read an interview with Petke who coached the New York team over a year ago when he had Thierry Henri as one of his players. He stated when talking to Henri about soccer was like talking to a Physicist for he knew so much about the game that it was a learning experience for Petke . It is obvious ,to me, that this whole AD is not doing it right and that can be seen by the product out on the field

  13. Dennis Mueller, May 29, 2017 at 7:54 a.m.

    I think Frank is trying to get Paul Gardner's gig.

  14. Dennis Mueller, May 29, 2017 at 8:20 a.m.

    Who should the US try to emulate? a look at the semifinalists in the FIFA World Cup
    Country since 1980 1948
    Germany 7 10
    Brazil 4 10
    Italy 3 5
    France 4 4
    Argentina3 3
    Netherlands 2 4
    Spain, England, Portugsl, Uraguay, Sweden,ChechoslovakiaCroatia, Poland, Turkey, South Korea, Austria,Hungary All 1 or 2 since WWII

  15. Bob Ashpole replied, May 29, 2017 at 1:53 p.m.

    Dennis, I know this is going to sound trite, but we should emulate successful development programs, not another country's style. We need to find what works best for us and not emulate what works best for someone else. Personally I think we already have a style, a blend of Hispanic and European influences. That is the cultures of the majority of soccer players in this country. That is what I have observed in adult amateur matches over the last 30 years. Not everyone plays that way, but I think the most successful teams do.

  16. Bob Ashpole replied, May 29, 2017 at 2:04 p.m.

    I thought I would clarify a bit, some teams don't want to mix Hispanic players with non-Hispanic players. But some do. Some find a way to play with each and some don't. Some simply divide the cultures by positions, but others mix the different cultures so that they work together attacking and defending. The players that do find a way to play together, are mixing determination with passion, combination passing with flair on the ball, and disciplined organization with improvisation.

  17. Bob Ashpole replied, May 29, 2017 at 2:07 p.m.

    I want to add that this is not an intellectual invention of coaches. It is just players playing the game we all love.

  18. frank schoon replied, May 29, 2017 at 3:54 p.m.

    Dennis what it comes down to is not to emulate another country which is impossible, that is what I don't like about certain groups in America advertising "training the Brazilian Way and all this garbage". It is just a way of fooling these naive parents and making money off them.
    Just look at what happened to Brazil that got beat 7-1 by Germany in the WC'14. I'm sure you won't find vans driving around Brazil advertising "soccer the German Way".
    Soccer is about the fundamentals , being able to place a long ball in some one back pocket 45yards down field, dribbling in a manner that you don''t lose the ball,passing in the most efficient manner to a teammate who has to do nothing extra in controlling the ball, knowing where the ball should go before you have the ball. Anticipate an action before the action. Other factors like talent and individualism will rise to the top. If you look at how Cruyff plays, you can't say he plays Dutch, he just plays efficient soccer, like Xavi who if you didn't know he's Spanish you would never associate him with playing Spanish style.

  19. don Lamb replied, May 29, 2017 at 9 p.m.

    Very true, Frank, and very well said. Soccer is not about "flair" like many would have you believe. It's much more about ability, decision making, and a feel for the game and competition. When people bemoan the lack of "flair" are displaying a shallow understanding of the game. To be clear, creativity is not "flair;" creativity is the ability to find alternative solutions to complex problems.

  20. Bob Ashpole replied, May 29, 2017 at 11:28 p.m.

    Don, I like your explanation of creativity, but I question your rejection of flair, if you are saying it is not part of the game at all. If you are just commenting on its relative importance, I can accept that. But if not, think about the Dutch; think about the Brazilians. Neither one uses the term flair, but they have other terms for it. The Dutch in particular about 15 years ago revamped their youth program to make winning more important than style. Pele in particular was calling for Brazilian football to go back to its joga bonita roots in the recent movie of his name.

  21. don Lamb replied, May 30, 2017 at 12:09 a.m.

    Bob - I am not rejecting the notion of flair, and I greatly admire players who have it. As you suggest, I am simply commenting on its relative importance. It is related to a player's personality more than anything else, and while entertaining and beneficial in some cases, flair is not a necessarily prerequisite for any type of successful player. In contrast, creativity is much more subtle, but also more useful and definitely necessary for all players to possess.

  22. frank schoon replied, May 30, 2017 at 9:57 a.m.

    Bob, Ajax is known for picking players with lots of technical skills, and flair as compared to Feyenoord whose players reflect more the city which is made up of dockworkers, blue collar, hard workers. Ajax is always supported by the celebrities, the Arts, for Ajax always wants to play nice soccer, with flair . That is why in Amsterdam we say when describing a player if he's an Ajax type of player or not. That's why Ajax tend to have more players with flair. But realize flair itself has to be functional and purposeful. And if Ajax is ahead by 3goals then the'll will open up the trick box as Cruyff says. This has become the culture of Ajax throughout their history....

  23. Fajkus Rules, May 29, 2017 at 11:23 a.m.

    CCV should know better than to lead with his forearm when going into a header situation, and he especially shouldn't be doing it if he already picked up a previous caution in the same game. It's not much different than leading with your elbow and FIFA has NUMEROUS videos (including one of Dempsey) leading with elbows or forearms into the heads or necks of other players competing for the aerial ball. FIFA says that they are all at least Yellow and some are straight reds.

  24. frank schoon, May 29, 2017 at 1:23 p.m.

    TIP 27. YOU HAVE AN UNBALANCED MIDFIELD WHEN THE MIDFIELDERS DISPLAY SIMILAR PLAYING CHARACTERISTICS. FOR EXAMPLE, IF ALL THE MIDFIELDERS TEND TO COME TO THE BALL, RECEIVE IT TO THE FEET, AND HAVE THEIR BACKS FACING DOWN FIELD. THIS IS WHAT A COACH HAS TO KNOW OF THE OPPONENTS STYLE AT MIDFIELD. A BALANCED SITUATION WOULD BE ONE PLAYER WITH THE BALL SHOULD HAVE SOMEONE COMING TO HIM AND ONE GOING AWAY.

  25. frank schoon, May 29, 2017 at 1:29 p.m.

    TIP 28. A BALANCED MIDFIELD IN A 4-3-3 SYSTEM IS AN ONE ATTACKING TYPE OF MIDFIELDER, ONE DEFENDING TYPE AND ONE CONTROLLING TYPE WHO SETS THE TEMPO OF THE GAME. AT BARCELONA INIESTA WAS THE ATTACKER, BUSQUETS THE DEFENDER AND XAVI THE CONTROLLER. THE FAMOUS DUTCH TEAM OF WC'74 , VAN HANEGEM THE CONTROLLER, WIM JANSEN THE DEFENDER AND JOHAN NEESKENS THE ATTACKER. I WOULD YOU ADVICE TO WATCH THE WC'74 GAMES OF HOLLAND
    ON YOUTUBE. WATCH #3 VAN HANEGEM THE CONTROLLER

  26. frank schoon, May 29, 2017 at 1:33 p.m.

    TIP 29. NOTE THE CONTROLLER WITH BARCELONA WAS XAVI THE RIGHT MIDFIELDER, AT WC'74 VAN HANEGEM WAS LEFT MIDFIELDER AS WELL AS ON THE GREAT AJAX TEAM OF CRUYFF, GERRIT MUHREN WAS THE CONTROLLER ON THE LEFT SIDE.

  27. frank schoon, May 29, 2017 at 1:39 p.m.

    TIP 30. WITH THE GREAT AJAX TEAM OF CRUYFF AND THE DUTCH TEAM OF WC'74, BOTH CONTROLLERS HAD ONE EXTREME ASSIGNMENT AND THAT WAS THEY WERE NOT ALLOWED TO EVER LOSE THE BALL.THIS ASSIGNMENT ALLOWED THE OTHER TEAMMATES OFF THE BALL TO GO ON OFFENSE AND NOT WORRY ABOUT RISK OF BALL LOSS WHILE THEY LEFT THEIR ORIGINAL POSITION. THEREFORE THE DUTCH AND AJAX ABLE TO CREATE SUCH GREAT ATTACKING TEAMS.

  28. frank schoon, May 29, 2017 at 1:50 p.m.

    TIP 31. THE CONTROLLER GERRIT MUHREN ON THE GREAT AJAX TEAM OF CRUYFF, WAS KNOWN ON THE AJAX TEAM TO HAVE BETTER TECHNICAL SKILLS THEN CRUYFF. BUT GERRIT AS A CONTROLLER WAS ONLY ALLOWED TO PLAY 40% OF HIS ABILITY IN ORDER FOR CRUYFF TO PLAY 100% OF HIS ABILITY. LIKEWISE THE MIDFIELD DEFENDER ,ARIE HAAN,ALSO KNOWN AS A GREAT DRIBBLER AND SHOOTER, WAS ONLY ALLOWED TO HEAD OR SHOOT THE BALL ON GOAL IN ORDER TO ALLOW CRUYFF TO PLAY 100%. THIS ONLY GOES TO SHOW HOW ADVANCED THE DUTCH WERE ALMOST 50YEARS AGO, IN THEIR MANNER OF PLAY.
    LEADING CRUYFF TO STATE THAT HE HAS YET TO SEE A MORE SOPHISTICATED SOCCER THAN WHAT WAS PLAYED THEN. IN SUM A GREAT COACH IS A PERSON WHO KNOWS HOW TO FIT A TEAM TOGETHER, FOR IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH PLACING THE BEST ELEVEN ON THE FIELD.

  29. Ric Fonseca, May 29, 2017 at 2:38 p.m.

    Interesting reading mis amigos! One concern that I have over the lamentations over the carded players is that it ain't good to cry over spilled milk, except to cry in your beers and though I didn't see the game so I cannot complaint or speak on the referees performance, so I will leave it at that. HOWEVER, as I've always said, referee bashing reaches a climax after games, calling the officials inept, homers, don't know the difference between a DFK from an IFK, etc. To wit yesterday I did see the LIGA MX Final between Chivas and Leon, a very tightly played game, that seemed to deteriorate to an almost free for all, players doing some pretty good academy award rolls, some getting whacked pretty good, and a helluva lot finger pointing by the Leon top scorer, a possible non PK call, etc., that even after the game was over and the chivas crowd went bananas, some Leon players went directly after some Chivas guys and vice versa. The point here is that we are all very quick to do some Monday "quartebacking." And yesterday tv experts, about 95% being former pro players, all of them at first praised the game official, but as the game progressed, wow and gee willikers, if one tuned in late and after the game and awards ceremony, the viewer would go away thinking the referees were grabbed directly from the MLS PRO ranks (with apologies) although it was an entertaining game I must say. Bottom line re CARDED players from our U20 team, a good part must be attributed to the coaches to remind them to play the ball and not get suckered into confrontations simply and because this ALWAYS seems/is the case in international competition. The players, and we can't say we don't fault them as they've played up and against tough international competition, ought to have known better. Simple as that. and now having to play without a key players, as they used to say, "ye reap what ye sow, mate!" Any how, just saying, some good reads, so PLAY ON!!!

  30. frank schoon, May 29, 2017 at 4 p.m.

    As far as refereeing goes, I've always told my players don't judge the referee unless you be judged, for you guys will make ten fold more mistakes during the game than the ref ...You just have to expect he will make mistakes and live with it....

  31. Nick Daverese, May 29, 2017 at 5:21 p.m.

    I have said this for years. I don't think we have a style in the United States. So what we should do is take the best of other countries styles and try to make that our style. I also they we should use old tactics that are not used anymore. Old becomes new when no one has seen them for 20 or thirty years. Plus we should play both counter game and a possession game.

    I even think when a manager leaves or gets fired from our national team they have done at least one thing that works. But when a new manager arrives he discards everything that the fired manager does even if some of it worked. I say keep what worked and then build on that and fix what did not work.

    If your going to counter you need skill and speed and space. Make sure every outside position has some speed. So you can interchange positions and still have speed. Space is easy player movement creates space. Anyone can learn to move it tells others where to attack.

    On officiating agree with frank explayers have an edge because they can tell when a player is liking to lose the ball so they are always around where the playing is coming from. Never get caught behind. A good official should not be noticed the game should be free flowing and played fair. There is something wrong when an officials gives out too many cards.

    He is now the biggest influence on the game. Not the players.

  32. Nick Daverese, May 29, 2017 at 5:30 p.m.

    There was a big European tournament game. I can't remember what teams were in it. But the official gave out around 12 booking in the game. Maybe Italy v England but not sure. I do remember the winning goal was struck on the near post. The striker was definitely Italian I think he came from the second division he had a back on his shoulder coming from the right flank. Keeper adjusted his position. The striker moved more outside to get separation from his defender. Keeper did not move more outside. So that left the near post with an angle to shoot at and he roofed it for a goal.

    A beautiful goal, but I just remember I never saw a game with so many bookings.

  33. Kent James, May 30, 2017 at 8:50 a.m.

    As a former referee with decades of experience, I hesitate to criticize a referee's performance. Additionally, as someone who thinks referees generally do not punish physical fouls as severely as they should, I hesitate to criticize a referee for giving too many yellow cards. But I have to say, in this game, the referee was much too quick to go to his pocket. Two cards stand out to me; the most impactful was the 2nd yellow to Carter-Vickers. His header was almost a perfect example of how to execute a defensive header on high ball in midfield; his forearm was on the opponent, but only because it had to go somewhere, and he wasn't even using it to prevent his opponent from going up, much less using it as a weapon. In the referee's defense, I think the 4th official actually convinced him to give the card. But it wasn't even a foul, much less one warranting a 2nd yellow card.

    The other play was when one of the Saudis was dribbling across midfield and one of our players put his hand on that player's shoulder; again, nothing annoys me more than the kind of clutching and grabbing that represents players knowingly breaking the rules for their advantage, but in this case, he neither grabbed him nor pushed him; there was barely even contact (and it was for a half-second). But the Saudi play dropped to the ground as soon as he felt the contact. And the ref gave him a card.

    Refereeing is difficult, and I'm sure this center is a good ref. But he did not have a good game, and unfortunately, it's going to hurt the US in our next game.

  34. frank schoon, May 30, 2017 at 12:48 p.m.

    Just a quick note on the announcers. We have without a doubt the worse announcers in soccer. And I mean announcers who have actually played (somewhat) and are retired. They absolutely say nothing or what we call in Holland "kicking open doors in". If the American public is going to learn the game and insights of the game, they need to have announcers with "critical" insight into the game, which means ,first of all, no American announcers for they are absolutely horrible and have nothing to say. I would like a dutch retired player to announce but they wouldn't last but 2 games,here, for the dutch are very critical and will tell you exactly what is going wrong or what should happen. But announcing with critical eye on things ,it can only improve the understanding of the game here. That is why I enjoyed so much when Cruyff did the color commentary in Holland for he'll let you see or explain what you don't see happening although you saw it . I remember in World Cup 2002, when Frank Rykaard the coach of the Dutch team at half time went back with his team to the locker room ,turned on the TV and all waited for Johan Cruyff to come on the set and explained what was wrong and what should happen and how to go about fixing it. When you listen to Cruyff talk soccer, you realize how little one really knows about the game.
    It is a humbling experience when you listen to Cruyff explaining the real details of the game. Once you have listened to Cruyff talk soccer as a commentator than you begin to realize what a bunch of morons we have here as soccer pundits....

  35. Jay Wall, May 30, 2017 at 3:29 p.m.

    One of Cruyff's teammates related in an interview that Johan had a very deep admiration for Chess Grand Master Bobby Fischer who would play multiple chess games at the same time against multiple chess masters from around the world and in every match would see many moves ahead of the masters he was playing. Cruyff so admired this ability he challenged himself to see and read as much of every game as possible in advance so he would always be on time, never too early taking an opponent with him and never too late not being fast enough to be there when needed. And instead of being critical of players who couldn't do what the team needed, he played in service of his teammates by constantly doing what his coach, Rinus Michels encouraged players to do . . . to talk and tell teammates that didn't see what they needed to do and learn to help the team. (Rinus Michels, FIFA's Coach of the 20th Century liked playing "pressing soccer" which the press called "total soccer"). >> Johan learned to question everything about the game and become so insightful hundreds of his quotes are used worldwide to explain and teach the game. >> On passes Cruyff said "Pass firmly, I don't care if it goes out of bounds, but I don't want it to be intercepted. A simple quote with 3 critical coaching points. Pass firm, it's easier to win the ball back on a restart, an interception is sometimes a game changing event. Another quote was "every disadvantage", like a red carded teammate, "has an advantage". Yes you can change playing a man down into an advantage. Or "Speed is often confused with insight, when you start to run earlier you appear faster" on making the decision when to move. >> We need to challange every player to learn the insights and game understanding to play the game faster in their minds eye, they it can ever be played in real time.

  36. Bob Ashpole replied, May 30, 2017 at 6:03 p.m.

    My "go to" sources for quotes are Cruyff and Wooden. Cruyff for his knowledge of soccer and Wooden for his knowledge of coaching.

  37. Nick Daverese, May 30, 2017 at 7:13 p.m.

    I have not listened to an announcer since 1994. I thought Shamus Malin was very good, but he is an acquired taste. Since then when I watch a game on tv. I watch with the sound off and I put on Doors CD's. I don't need an announcer to tell me what I see in a game.

  38. Bob Ashpole replied, May 31, 2017 at 3:07 a.m.

    Nick, you haven't missed anything. The announcers for the U20 matches must have thought that they were working a radio broadcast. No value added at all.

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