Paul Caligiuri throws his name into hat for U.S. Soccer president

Paul Caligiuri became the second National Soccer Hall of Famer from the 1990 and 1994 U.S. World Cup teams after Eric Wynalda who has entered the race for U.S. Soccer president.


Caligiuri famously scored the goal at Trinidad & Tobago in 1989 that qualified the USA for the World Cup for the first time in 40 years. He played at four clubs in Germany and for Columbus and the LA Galaxy in MLS. He finished his international career with 110 caps and started every game in the 1990 and 1994 World Cups.

He coached at Division II Cal Poly Ponoma for seven seasons. He still coaches in South California, working with Orange County FC, which has teams in the NPSL and UPSL.

Candidates have until Dec. 12 to submit their paperwork and secure their three endorsements from U.S. Soccer members.

U.S. Soccer presidential candidates:
Paul Caligiuri
Carlos Cordeiro
Steve Gans
Paul Lapointe
Michael Winograd
Eric Wynalda

18 comments about "Paul Caligiuri throws his name into hat for U.S. Soccer president".
  1. Ed M, November 4, 2017 at 8:34 a.m.

    Another candidate with only a name. Where has Paul been and what has he been doing all of this time? Let's get real now. The only candidate with the true credentials and background to back it up is Paul Lapointe.

  2. Bob Ashpole replied, November 4, 2017 at 12:32 p.m.

    Really Ed? I am not knocking Mr. Lapointe, but there is nothing special about Mr. Lapointe, the candidate, except he apparently doesn't have any atheltic experience. He is a businessman (car dealership) and involved in amateur adult soccer as a team owner and league administrator. Some people would not support a candidate who has been a fan not a player. What does a fan know about athletic competition, team building and player development besides what he sees from the stands? 

  3. Keith Bantz, November 4, 2017 at 11:21 a.m.

    I always believe the more people who participate in a fair and democratic election, the better and healthier the organization is. So everyone in the water!

  4. frank schoon, November 4, 2017 at 12:59 p.m.

    I would like to hear , Caligiuri, Eric Wynalda and some of the others on their ideas on they want to do..I do think we up and down the ranks from the field to the board room on all the committees people in the know, like Tab Ramos, Hugo Perez, Claudio Reyna, etc who have fought the battles. We need to get a concensus on those types who have had high level experience in soccer. We don't need someone who can use this position as add-on to his resume...

  5. Kris Spyrka replied, November 4, 2017 at 1:24 p.m.

    Frank, I agree.  Consensus building, but let's do it fast.  Should have been happening the morning after T&T.  I went and listened to Hugo Perez last night here in Silicon Valley.  He was part of a discussion panel, "Future of USA Soccer."  I think coming from El Salvador, he brings a unique cultural perspective.  One line of thinking was, if the priority is to qualify for WC, then you realistically need your U's touring an playing in CONCACAF, not touring Europe.  Let's face it, all these countries in the Hex are only interested in one thing, beating USA and/or Mexico, that's their World Cup.  Then, we go in, like T&T with Yankee arrogance.....and lose.

  6. frank schoon replied, November 4, 2017 at 2:34 p.m.

    Kris, all well and dandy and i"m sure Hugo has got some good suggestions, but whether to play our U's CONCACEF or tour in Europe is not high on my list of improving the overall development of our youth. Here is one example how many of these kids after playing and developing in DA after 10 years can use both feet or for that matter look at the of the national U's how many of them can even use both feet. So whether playing CONCACEF or touring is not an issue when I see such a lack  of good technical foundation. Again, competition is good but first comes GOOD technical development

  7. Ric Fonseca, November 4, 2017 at 4:57 p.m.

    Paul is a good man, a local Southern Californian, and I've known him since his pre-UCLA days and during his stint with the LAG. Now as to his qualifications, I can bet that they're far more larger in scope than those of Cordeiro as far as lowing soccer at its bare grass roots than Corderiso(sp?) Both of their are more athletically-soccer-knowledagble while the other guys seem to be more business-oriented.  At least both Eric and Paul have had the enviable opportunity to have played accross the width and breadth of this country as well as internationally - something many commentators do not point out.  >Frank Schoon, I feel you're wrong thinking Paul - and for that matter Eric also - just want to "add-on-to-his resume (sic)", while Ramos, Perez, and Reyna have just as good and excellent playing qualifications, I most certainly wish they'd also toos in their candidate hat into the mix, however my feeling about this is that ALL of them including Eric and Paul, know only too well how disfunctional US Soccer can be and is. 

  8. Bob Ashpole replied, November 4, 2017 at 5:37 p.m.

    I agree with you Ric. USSF needs business managers but business managers should not be making the soccer decisions. The solution is not going to be merely electing one former player as president. USSF needs to include as many former players and top coaches in management of the sport as practical along with business and technical experts.

    My primary concern is that soccer people are making the soccer decisions.
     

  9. frank schoon replied, November 4, 2017 at 9:14 p.m.

    Ric, I think you have misread me about resume enhancers. I was not referring to the guys who have soccer background ,but those CEO's on the organizational side with little soccer experience who perhaps see this more as political move for something else further down the road, this ar the guys that don't want in soccer

  10. Kris Spyrka, November 4, 2017 at 5:30 p.m.

    I think his point was, that as a nation we don't plan for the inevitable.  The pitch and atmosphere in T&T are widely different than playing somewhere in Europe.  I would argue, that part of what happens is that we are mentally too spoiled to overcome adverse conditions.  We are not playing friendlies against European teams when qualifying for the all important World Cup, or even Olympics for that matter. Being, we should go for more of the live fire exercises to gain experience, rather than jetting off to Europe.  DA's from what I've witnessed regionally, are a work in progress.  Not sure what formula is being used there, it may just become another tool for a club to establish a fifedom, same as ODP, PDP, ECNL, NPL, etc..  Maybe we should implement a 'no child left behind' program for our soccer youth.

  11. frank schoon replied, November 4, 2017 at 10:55 p.m.

    Good point too!

  12. Bob Ashpole replied, November 5, 2017 at 2:24 a.m.

    No-child-left-behind is a good way to describe training for pre-teens.

    I suspect that today's national team players have little experience playing on bad fields. When I was their age, bad fields were all that we had to practice on. Some colleges had great grass fields, but they were used just for matches. Likewise I suspect they didn't routinely play pickup games in vacant lots and streets.

  13. frank schoon replied, November 5, 2017 at 8:12 a.m.

    Bob, good point. We grew up in the city with no grass , but on cobble stones ,at times, played sometimes with rubber boots on when it rained, and with balls any size or weight but no soccer ball. Van Hanegem considered by the Dutch as the greatest midfielder, ever ,stated playing in horse pastures as a kid improved his game for you had to concentrate and anticipate always what the ball would possibly do especially in trapping, receiving and passing. One really has to wonder why the kids in the street soccer days were soooooo much better skilled ,because they learned to play under conditions and facilities soooo  much worse than today. Just look at the 3rd world kids who basically can't afford shoes and likewise learn to play on lousy fields and have poor facilities, but are so much better skilled than our kids. That is why it is not money, fantastic organization, great facilities that makes good soccer players as you well see with kids from 3rd world countries and I played... And as far as "no kids left behind" is a meaningless term, other than  dealing with rec. kids only. That term is meaningless when I grew up in the street soccer days or even with todays kids of 3rd world countries for in order to get better you had to work for it to get better, for their was or is no one to help you other than yourself through lots of playing, practicing, watching and doing. This is why I say we need to seriously study all the elements of street soccer  that contribute to making the kids so well skilled and apply that to our current youth, for having nice facilities, nice organization does not necessarily produce great skilled players.

  14. Bob Ashpole, November 5, 2017 at 1:44 p.m.

    It is an old US Dept. of Education slogan. Focuses on the low end of the group and passing standardized tests. Drops individualized attention especially on top end of the class. 

    (That is my understanding of the concept, but I suspect most educators would say I got it wrong.)

  15. Ric Fonseca, November 5, 2017 at 4:06 p.m.

    It is amazing for me to continue reading about stret soccer, though I too played and learned my skills on the street dodging cars, parked and coming through, and I also remember going to play soccer and baseball in the railroad yards that were close to our homes in Mexico City. Yet, IMHO, we must get away from the "good old days" syndrome and focus on the good and PRESENT days, and perhaps even support old Kony Konstins (sp) call for a soccer revolution and have hundreds of small soccer pitches and relate on futbolito. But back to the candidates, I've now had the opportunity to hear Eric Wynaldas one-hour long interview with Hercules Gomez (forgot the other guy's name) and liked what he said, and also read Paul C's plans for the position to which he aspires. As for Cordeiro's I believe he let the cat out of the bag when he states that he's been harboring the position for some years now (five?) and says it is "not a dig against Sunil" (to paraphrase him) yet, his verbosely detailed plan reads like a "true politician's" platform.  As for the other candidates, never heard of them, so as far as I am concerned the only viable candidates are Eric, Paul, and Cordeiro - and even more mysterious is Sunil's "refusal" to not sunbmit his name, which leaves me to think that he's waiting to see which way the winds blow. And even more curious, I've just noted that he - SG - took part in a townwhouse discussion for the NY West Soccer Association (right in his back yard?) but no mention of his candidacy.

  16. Bob Ashpole replied, November 6, 2017 at 12:39 a.m.

    Ric, I agree. Those three candidates are my short list of preferences. The discriminating factor is experience. I think Sunil Gulati's best role is to continue as a member of the FIFA Executive Committee. Hopefully that role will continue. If he ran for another term as president, he would be on my short list too.

    I have never met any of the candidates, but Wynalda and Caligiuri both impress me as intelligent and well spoken. (I have no reason to doubt the intelligence of any of the other candidates for that matter.) I hope that the unsuccesful candidates will continute to support US Soccer, as the sport needs talented people.     

  17. frank schoon replied, November 6, 2017 at 7:03 a.m.

    Ric, you obviously have not taken my suggestion of studying the elements of street soccer to heart.
    It has nothing to do with nostalgia of street soccer. STREET SOCCER is nothing other than where kids can meet and play together ,mix ages, where they can hone and practice and learn the various skills competitively under less than adequate conditions, usually, not always. I played on the streets, Bob mentioned,vacant lots, you mentioned near railroad yards,but no matter where it is all about pick up games even played on hundreds of small pitches, if that can be done.THAT is what it is all about! NO NOSTALGIA But a place to play pick up games! Now what is it that you still don't understand about street soccer.

  18. frank schoon replied, November 6, 2017 at 7:03 a.m.

    Ric, you obviously have not taken my suggestion of studying the elements of street soccer to heart.
    It has nothing to do with nostalgia of street soccer. STREET SOCCER is nothing other than where kids can meet and play together ,mix ages, where they can hone and practice and learn the various skills competitively under less than adequate conditions, usually, not always. I played on the streets, Bob mentioned,vacant lots, you mentioned near railroad yards,but no matter where it is all about pick up games even played on hundreds of small pitches, if that can be done.THAT is what it is all about! NO NOSTALGIA But a place to play pick up games! Now what is it that you still don't understand about street soccer.

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