Anthony Precourt: Austin FC needed to jump at chance to hire Josh Wolff

Austin FC, which will begin play in MLS in 2021, has named Josh Wolff as its first head coach.

The 42-year-old Wolff will join Austin at the beginning of 2020 after finishing up the year as an assistant coach on Gregg Berhalter's U.S. national team staff.

Wolff was also an assistant coach under Berhalter, his former teammate on the national team and at 1860 Munich in Germany, from 2014-18 at the Columbus Crew, whose owner, Anthony Precourt, launched Austin FC.

"We have a great level of comfort with Josh," said Precourt. "He is a rising star in Major League Soccer. Numerous clubs were very interested in him so when there is a great opportunity to hire a real talent we need to jump on it. Hiring Josh is a testament to how committed we are to putting a really good team on the field in 2021. There's a lot to do."

Precourt said the next task will be hiring a sporting director.

Wolff, who represented the USA at the 2002 and 2006 World Cups, began his coaching career in 2012 with D.C. United as an assistant coach.

"Josh has an extremely high soccer IQ, high character, high work ethic," said Precourt. "He shares our competitiveness and we've had great success over the years together."



The Crew made the playoffs in four of the five years Wolff was with the club. In 2015, it won the Eastern Conference, falling at home to the Portland Timbers in MLS Cup.

"His continual development as a coach, hard work, and dedication to his craft has certainly earned him this opportunity," said Berhalter in a statement. "The attention to detail and meticulous preparation are qualities that will help him be successful on and off the field."

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13 comments about "Anthony Precourt: Austin FC needed to jump at chance to hire Josh Wolff".
  1. Eric R., July 23, 2019 at 10:20 p.m.

    Precourt is a fool and Wolff has coach training wheels on. The fact he’s a head coach of a team despite lack of substantial experience is a black mark on US soccer more than anything else.

  2. Nick Barbaro replied, July 23, 2019 at 11:25 p.m.

    Having a rooting interest here in Austin, I hope you're wrong, but am curious why you think that.  Not knowing that much about Wolff, it seems at first glance that five years as an assistant, then another one with the national team, is a decent amount of experience for a first-time head coach.  No?  Other thoughts?

  3. Donald Lee replied, July 23, 2019 at 11:37 p.m.

    Most coachs in the world started with same or less experience than Josh Wolff.  Zinedene Zidane had far less experience than Wolff has when he took over RM.    Lampard, Terry and Gerard all became head coachs with far less experience.

  4. Wooden Ships replied, July 24, 2019 at 12:04 a.m.

    That’s a reasonable point Donald with regard to coaching experience, with a notable difference in that 3 of those guys are some of the best to ever play for England and Zidane was one of the greatest players of all time. We do know that great players rarely make great managers or even pursue coaching post playing days. I do hope Josh is successful. And, I hope he has a better talent eye than GB, he wasn’t a defender so he has that going for him. 

  5. frank schoon, July 24, 2019 at 1:44 a.m.

    Per se, i’m not worried about the fact of lacking coaching experience, as much as the ability of able to “see” the game, which so few coaches are capable of doing. But one thing That will trouble me is that if I see him with a note pad and pen , a characteristic that began with bean counter and control freak Louis van Gaal back in the 90’s. I would like to see whom he picks as his assistants. So far the the only thing he’s got going for him is that he wasn’t a defender.  

  6. beautiful game replied, July 24, 2019 at 7:51 a.m.

    F.S., makes a good point. Assistant coach is most probably as important as the head coach. 

  7. Alan Blackledge, July 24, 2019 at 8:56 a.m.

    And somehow Beckenbaur won the Word Cup as a defender and head coach! Go figure!

  8. Albert Harris replied, July 24, 2019 at 9:03 a.m.

    Franz was hardly your standard 'hack and whack' defender though. Redefined the role a deep lying centerback or defensive midfielder could play influencing the game with his passing. Very few "saw" the game as well as he did per FS's point.

  9. frank schoon replied, July 24, 2019 at 11:13 a.m.

    Alan, Beckenbauer was a  winger, who later became an attacking midfielder, and transformed into an attacking libero.  In other words , he was an attacking player, not a defending. BTW, I don’t think he has ever attempted a slide tackle or had a stain on his shorts.
     You need to know your soccer history a little better.....

  10. Frans Vischer replied, July 24, 2019 at 11:49 a.m.

    AB, I would add that, though Beckenbauer was a wonderful player, that German team he coached was the most mundane, boring WC team in history. That was an awful final!

  11. frank schoon replied, July 24, 2019 at 11:59 a.m.

    Frans, Germans are like that in their game. They are very results oriented, and don’t care one wit about nice soccer.  That is why there is a lot of difference between a Cruyff coached and a Beckenbauer coached team.

  12. frank schoon replied, July 24, 2019 at 11:59 a.m.

    Frans, Germans are like that in their game. They are very results oriented, and don’t care one wit about nice soccer.  That is why there is a lot of difference between a Cruyff coached and a Beckenbauer coached team.

  13. Wallace Wade, July 24, 2019 at 9:30 a.m.

    Welcome to MK Dons Mr. Wolff!

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