What They're Saying: Stephanie McCaffrey

“The reason we’re having a hard time getting people to dump large amounts of capital into investing in women’s soccer is that, in general, women don’t have tons of capital relative to men. I think I have the quantitative skill set and — with Wharton — the business acumen to be the one who says, ‘OK, I’m going to make sports ownership-type money and give it back to the sport that gave me everything.’”

-- Former U.S. international Stephanie McCaffrey, who played four years in the NWSL but retired after the 2018 season because of an illness. She is enrolled in Wharton’s MBA program with the goal of going into private equity and buying a women’s soccer team of her own. (Philadelphia Inquirer)
2 comments about "What They're Saying: Stephanie McCaffrey".
  1. R2 Dad, January 23, 2020 at 3:25 p.m.

    This is gonna be a tough row to hoe for her, going from a sport dominated by men to a business dominated by men. With 6 caps and 1 goal, she isn't exactly a household hame. Best of luck, and hope you convice a hundred of your friends to do the same--the drop-out rate in private equity is up there with professional sports.

  2. frank schoon, January 24, 2020 at 11:09 a.m.

    “The reason we’re having a hard time getting people to dump large amounts of capital into investing in women’s soccer is that, in general, women don’t have tons of capital relative to men."  Really, you mean to tell me  the lack of investment in women's soccer is due lack of capital by women. What has capital have to do with gender...Investors don't care where they can make the money, they only care about the color of green. And if they think they can make money in women's soccer the male investors will invest. Period!!  Too bad the Wharton School of Business missed out on teaching that concept ...

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