What We're Reading

Great Players Don't Necessarily Equal Great Managers

You might think that being a great professional player is a prerequisite for being a great manager, but history shows that playing pedigree often has little to do with success in the manager's chair. The top four managers in the Barclay's English Premier League (in order of total honors won) are Manchester United's Sir Alex Ferguson, Arsene Wenger of Arsenal, Jose Mourinho of Chelsea and Rafael Benitez of Liverpool. None of these managers, with the possible exception of Ferguson, were memorable soccer players, and each started their managerial careers humblyat clubs you couldn't place if you were given a map. After humble beginnings, these men have become some of the world's greatest managers. Former "greats" like Kevin Keegan, Bryan Robson and Kenny Dalglish, have gone on to meet some success behind the coach's chair but they were never quite as good behind a desk as they were on the field. Keegan and Dalglish, two of Britain's greatest players in the 70's and 80's, have now all but retired as managers before the age of 50. So what of Roy Keane? Fresh from retirement as a player, Keane steps in to the manager's chair at Sunderland this week. Taking over at the Stadium of Light is hardly a small start to a managerial career. Will Keane make a great manager? Or will his pride and temperament stand in the way? Says The Times, "The strong suspicion is that Keane has much to offer because there is intelligence to go with his destructive rage, but many of the same leadership qualities can be found in Bryan Robson, who has encountered difficulties in the dugout."

Read the whole story at The Times Online »

Next story loading loading..