• A New Era for MLS
    The arrival of an international celebrity and fashion icon who also plays midfield is just one of many radical changes in store as Major League Soccer enters the big time.MUCH BUZZ ABOUT BECKS. When will he arrive? Where will he and Victoria live, and where will the kids go to school? Will the team travel by charter or private jet to avoid massive crowds and possible security problems?Nearly lost in the blizzard of speculation about David Beckham is how well will he play when burdened by insane scrutiny, summer heat, long flights and a ...
  • Youth Beat: The African Connection
    The increase in immigration from Africa has created a burgeoning source of talent for the U.S. youth national team program. About two million people fled Sierra Leone during the decade-long civil war that resulted in tens of thousands of deaths and destroyed two-thirds of the nation's infrastructure. One of the refugees was an 11-year-old boy named Israel Sesay. Sesay moved to Washington, D.C., to join his father, who had left the West African country when Israel was 6 months old. The father, working several jobs, had little time for Israel, who eagerly awaited the arrival of his mother. ...
  • Where Are America's Black Coaches?
    Leaders of the NSCAA Black Soccer Coaches Committee hail the increase of black players in mainstream American soccer -- but now await an increase in opportunities for black coaches. Hylton Dayes, the chairman of the BSCC, is the head coach of the University of Cincinnati and a Region II ODP coach. ''I got here in 1982,'' says the Jamaica-born Dayes, ''and I think the African-American, or player of color involvement, has increased ten-fold.'' Forty percent of the 40 players in the U.S. U-17 residency camp in Bradenton are black, including nine from the African immigrant community. ...
  • Marketing Soccer Is Getting Easier
    MLS marketing and public relations vet Dan Courtemanche predicts a stellar 2007 season. Had Dan Courtemanche accepted that office-supply sales job instead of opting for an unpaid internship with a sports marketing firm 17 years ago, he probably wouldn't have been ''trying to manage a tidal wave'' on the 11th day of 2007. A few hours into that Thursday, Courtemanche's cell phone and office voicemail were full. He changed his outgoing messages, instructing callers to e-mail him. ''I received close to 500 e-mails from media members making requests that day,'' says Courtemanche, MLS senior vice president of ...