• Women's World Cup: Top 10 Stories
    1 The long road to respect Women's soccer has come a long way in the last half century since the DFB, the powerful governing body of German soccer, attempted to ban a group of women from forming a national league in 1955. "Irreparable damage" would come to their bodies and "the public display of their bodies will offend morality and decency," the DFB cautioned. While the women's version of the Bundesliga still draws paltry crowds and players must work part-time to make ends meet, German interest in women's soccer has grown significantly. Germany's 2-0 victory over ...
  • MLS: Rating the All-Rookie XI
    Fueled by the new Designated Player rule and an influx of foreign players, competition for roster spots forced rookies into the toughest situation of any group coming to MLS out of college since its launch in 1996. Several players who emerged started more than 20 games and played invaluable roles in their first seasons. The race for MLS Rookie of the Year comes down to three outstanding players, two of whom, not surprisingly, were among the top three selections in the SuperDraft last January. This year's best rookie, as per balloting conducted by the league, will be announced the ...
  • U.S. Abroad-Castillo: From New Mexico to Old Mexico
    How a small-town U.S. boy ended up on the Mexican national team. Even when Edgar Castillo was only 4 years old, he watched soccer games on television. "He'd come over to our house to play with my boys," says Linda Lara. "If I turned on the television for a soccer game, Edgar would start watching. The other boys would go goof around outside or something, but Edgar would stay glued to the TV. He'd sit there, biting his nails, mesmerized by the game." When he started playing for Lara's club, Strikers FC of Las Cruces, N.M., ...
  • Youth Beat: Go Abroad, Young Man?
    Interest from foreign clubs in teenage American players is at an all-time high and an increasing number of youngsters are considering leaving their homes to pursue their soccer dreams aboard. One day Francisco Lletget noticed something slightly odd about the way his son, Sebastian, was eating breakfast, so he approached and took a closer look. While scooping cereal into his mouth, Sebastian was tapping a soccer ball back and forth under the table. "The thing about Sebi," says Francisco, "he always wants to play soccer. Even now at age 15, he still plays soccer in the house." ...
  • U.S. Abroad: Decision Time for Rossi
    The name of American-born Giuseppe Rossi has arisen once again as U.S. head coach Bob Bradley scours the globe for players to restock his player pool. Rossi's career is steaming along as he scores goals for Spanish club Villarreal and the Italian under-21 team, for which he may play next year in the Olympic Games. One way or another, the strange saga of New Jersey native Giuseppe Rossi ever playing for the United States will soon be put to rest. And maybe the American fans and journalists pleading on Web sites and in blogs for him to change ...
  • MLS Newcomers Boost Profile
    Only five Designated Players were signed in 2007 to varying degrees of success, yet many teams acquired players by more traditional means who have contributed greatly in their first MLS seasons. The tale is told in MLS offices of how skittish were Chicago Fire officials to herald the arrival of Mexican icon Cuauhtemoc Blanco in early April. A gathering of a few hundred fans suited the team, but a bit of prodding from MLS persuaded the Fire to stage a more expansive event. His signing had yet to be officially announced, yet more than 5,000 fans showed up ...
  • Josef Schulz Takes Dutch-Brazilian Approach
    Worldwide search for player gold mine led Austrian Josef Schulz to South Florida. Josef Schulz once spent two years traveling the world scouting young soccer talent. But on this day, nine years ago, he was just taking a walk with his wife, Barbara, in their Boca Raton, Fla., neighborhood. They stopped to watch a pickup game and Schulz spotted an exceptional 8-year-old. "I asked my wife, 'Do I see this right or am I dreaming?'" Schulz recalls. The boy was Josmer "Jozy" Altidore, a New Jersey-born son of Haitian immigrants whose family had relocated in South ...