• SA Q&A with Bruce Arena: '1999 was just basically a honeymoon year'
    The U.S. national team closed out the year with a 2-1 loss in Morocco. Bruce Arena reflects on his first full year as coach, the year in MLS and the U-17 world championships. He also peeks ahead at American soccer in 2000. SOCCER AMERICA: How was Morocco? BRUCE ARENA: It was very good. It was a good trip for us; it was a good way to cap off the year by getting a look at a few players we haven't seen in a while and play against a very good team. SA: Who stood out in the …
  • MLS: MetroStars waive Eduardo Hurtado
    The MetroStars have waived Eduardo Hurtado, the Ecuador international who scored 17 goals and 17 assists in 55 games for the team since arriving from the L.A. Galaxy in April 1998. The MetroStars announced that they needed to trade or release an international player by Dec. 1 in order to comply with Major League Soccer's limit on foreign-born players. (They are adding GermanyÆs Lothar Matthaeus for the 2000 season.) But HurtadoÆs release comes as no surprise; newly appointed Metros coach Octavio Zambrano was at the GalaxyÆs helm when Hurtado was traded to the MetroStars for Wellington Sanchez.
  • American Century: The first 50 years
    The first - and best - U.S. World Cup All Quiet on the Western Front" won the Oscar, Dashiell Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon" hit the bookstands and C.W. Tombaugh discovered Pluto - the planet, not the dog. The Great Depression was underway, and so was the launch of a soccer world championship. In Hoboken, N.J., Frank Sinatra attended junior high school, and the U.S. national team boarded the S.S. Munargo for the 1930 World Cup in Uruguay. Sixteen men who had never played together were selected by Manager Wilfred R. Cummings and trained by Coach Robert …
  • Q&A with the SA Editors: Dec. 1, 1999
    Alex Scott Titirangi, New Zealand Why did soccer die out in America after the 1930 World Cup? It seems amazing to me that the U.S. did so well and then the sport just seemed to die out until the 1970's. Mike Woitalla: The players who took the United States to the semifinals of the first World Cup came from the American Soccer League, an East Coast league that was quite professional for its day. Players were given attractive jobs at the firms that sponsored the teams. Large crowds comprised of working-class immigrants cheered them on. However, the league began to …
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